Skip to main content

It's a Green Kind of Planet, uh, Dude!

9146_1_230One of the complaints that those who like old movies have about newer specimens is that they suffer too much from visual ADD, unable to settle on an image long enough for it to register or on a dialogue long enough to create a character in depth. Everything gets hyped until nothing carries any meaning aside from nervous excitation.

So it is with considerable delight that the environmentally conscious, not to mention the culturally self-conscious, can look forward to a channel where actually focusing on an issue, any issue, might be considered taxing: Planet Green. The AP's David Bauder previews  tomorrow's debut:

"The network is not only not finger-wagging, it's sexy, it's interesting, it's irreverent," [network president Eileen] O'Neill,  said.

Planet Green doesn't want to be a network that appeals only to tree huggers and will always resist a heavy-handed approach, she said. Instead of scolding people not to waste paper by using juice boxes, the network will profile a person who built a business upon recycling them.

Thus you don't have to worry about whether or not to get your juice from a box, you just have to admire a guy who got rich turning them into paper towels. Okay.

The programming aims to mix lite celebrities with lite eco-friendly messages.

HBO "Entourage" star [Adrien] Grenier is host of "Alter Eco," where he and a team of experts show celebrities and ordinary people "the way to a hip green lifestyle."

Since leading a square green lifestyle would be, like, death, you know?

But there's more!

[Tommy] Lee and Ludacris will star, beginning in August, in "Battleground Earth," a series of competitions between the rocker and rapper to determine who's the greenest.

If there's one thing we know for sure, it's that the one who's the greenest will also be the hippest. (If we're lucky, John Travolta will drop by in full Cyclon drag and call them both rat-brains.)

While we're doubtful about the approach The Discovery Channel has chosen for this new outlet - available wherever Discovery Home was, as Plant Green takes its place - we've been wrong before and are reasonably sure we will be again.

Discovery, after all, has put up some good shows and if their initial approach to Planet Green doesn't quite work out, they can always tweak it to something perhaps a little less hip and just a touch more substantive. We might then tune in to see what's what even if Adrien Grenier were the host.

A little break from Lieberman-Warner. We'll be back on the beat tomorrow.

Adrien Grenier and Paris Hilton. Picture from Trendhunter. The text fills us in on the couple:  The pair attended the 11th Hour ForestEthics premier together, and have been spotted zooming around in a Toyoto Prius hybrid, “scoping out a new eco-friendly home for Paris.” That's almost too much eco-hipness for one sentence to contain.

A little more on Grenier's bona fides, also from Trendhunter: For him, it’s no publicity stunt; it’s a way of life. “I try to eat free range organic foods. I try and walk if I can, which is why I love New York. Take a train. My home is a green home. To me I look at it as an investment and the things may cost a little bit more but ultimately it pays for itself. And then it gives you low emissions and its good for the environment. So people invest in all sorts of bizarre things. Why not invest in the quality of life?” Why not indeed?

Comments

Kirk Sorensen said…
Somebody had to comment on this...

Why should anyone care about the lifestyles of young, vacuous, grungy/over-makeuped Hollywood media fodder who each have the carbon footprint of a small community?

I wonder the same thing when I'm going through the checkout line at the supermarket and wonder why they don't have Popular Mechanics, Aviation Week, or Scientific American there instead of the tabloid rags.

Buy your Prius and your CFLs and organic hummus and all carbon sins will be forgiven...

Popular posts from this blog

How Nanomaterials Can Make Nuclear Reactors Safer and More Efficient

The following is a guest post from Matt Wald, senior communications advisor at NEI. Follow Matt on Twitter at @MattLWald.

From the batteries in our cell phones to the clothes on our backs, "nanomaterials" that are designed molecule by molecule are working their way into our economy and our lives. Now there’s some promising work on new materials for nuclear reactors.

Reactors are a tough environment. The sub atomic particles that sustain the chain reaction, neutrons, are great for splitting additional uranium atoms, but not all of them hit a uranium atom; some of them end up in various metal components of the reactor. The metal is usually a crystalline structure, meaning it is as orderly as a ladder or a sheet of graph paper, but the neutrons rearrange the atoms, leaving some infinitesimal voids in the structure and some areas of extra density. The components literally grow, getting longer and thicker. The phenomenon is well understood and designers compensate for it with a …

Missing the Point about Pennsylvania’s Nuclear Plants

A group that includes oil and gas companies in Pennsylvania released a study on Monday that argues that twenty years ago, planners underestimated the value of nuclear plants in the electricity market. According to the group, that means the state should now let the plants close.

Huh?

The question confronting the state now isn’t what the companies that owned the reactors at the time of de-regulation got or didn’t get. It’s not a question of whether they were profitable in the '80s, '90s and '00s. It’s about now. Business works by looking at the present and making projections about the future.

Is losing the nuclear plants what’s best for the state going forward?

Pennsylvania needs clean air. It needs jobs. And it needs protection against over-reliance on a single fuel source.


What the reactors need is recognition of all the value they provide. The electricity market is depressed, and if electricity is treated as a simple commodity, with no regard for its benefit to clean air o…

Why Nuclear Plant Closures Are a Crisis for Small Town USA

Nuclear plants occupy an unusual spot in the towns where they operate: integral but so much in the background that they may seem almost invisible. But when they close, it can be like the earth shifting underfoot.

Lohud.com, the Gannett newspaper that covers the Lower Hudson Valley in New York, took a look around at the experience of towns where reactors have closed, because the Indian Point reactors in Buchanan are scheduled to be shut down under an agreement with Gov. Mario Cuomo.


From sea to shining sea, it was dismal. It wasn’t just the plant employees who were hurt. The losses of hundreds of jobs, tens of millions of dollars in payrolls and millions in property taxes depressed whole towns and surrounding areas. For example:

Vernon, Vermont, home to Vermont Yankee for more than 40 years, had to cut its municipal budget in half. The town closed its police department and let the county take over; the youth sports teams lost their volunteer coaches, and Vernon Elementary School lost th…