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Looking Back at NEA 2012

After a whirlwind three days in Charlotte at NEA 2012, I'm back in Washington. And while I'm done unpacking my suitcase at home, we're not done unpacking all of the content we created during the conference.

One of the highlights of the conference had to be a roundtable discussion on industry safety and Fukushima that was moderated by NEI's Chief Nuclear Officer Tony Pietrangelo. Joining Tony were Chip Pardee of Exelon, David Lochbaum of the Union of Concerned Scientists and Bill Borchardt of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Luckily, we captured the entire discussion on video, and will be sharing it with you as soon as we're able to get the clip processed and uploaded to our YouTube Channel. In addition, we'll also be combing the questions that were submitted for the session that our panelists weren't able to answer due to time constraints.

Among my favorite moments from the conference had to be getting to see the pride and joy on the faces of our TIP Award winners. That was clearly the case when I got a chance to speak with the combined team from Duke Energy and AREVA that came home with the B. Ralph Sylvia Award, what's know in the industry as the "best of the best."

Click here to watch the video I shot with my iPhone just minutes after Preston Gillespie from Duke strode to the stage to claim the award. (Apologies ahead of time, as in my excitement I botched the name of the award.) For the total download on what won the award for the Duke/AREVA team, be sure to watch the video I embedded below.



We were also honored to be joined by Rep. G.K. Butterfield, a Democrat from North Carolina's 1st District. He spoke on Tuesday morning and delivered the following address:


I promise more tomorrow, but for now, I'll refer you back to the NEA 2012 landing page that was set up on NEI.org for further details. Look for more video tomorrow.

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