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Patrick Moore’s Economic Justice

hanglidingPatrick Moore, ex-Greenpeace, sees in nuclear energy an interesting argument for what he terms “environmental justice,” which is true enough, and economic justice, used in the headline, works as well:
African-American and Hispanic advocacy groups have historically been focused on civil rights, but they're "morphing into economic development," Moore said, and looking at energy policy for the first time.
Unlike many other big industrial facilities, he noted, polls show nuclear power plants have increasing popular support the closer people live to them. Nuclear plants are "wealth creating machines," Moore said, with no pollution, better roads and schools financed by the plants' property taxes, and large payrolls.
Moore is right about this. Nuclear energy facilities are also often union shops, which offers a good path to the middle class and out of economic uncertainty. A city of industry can be a world of opportunity and nuclear energy plants have the added benefit of not turning communities into pollution laden sump holes. A cooling tower is not a smoke stack.
Moore told AOL Energy that he is reaching out to African-American and Hispanic business and labor groups, telling them that nuclear plants, in contrast to projects like coal plants, are long-term community assets.
I’m sure the coal industry might say a few words about that, but Moore has a point.
[N]uclear not only needs thousands of skilled workers when plants are built new but generations of skilled workers to keep the units running for 60 or more years.
Moore addresses other issues, too, including natural gas and small reactors – and his comments on these are interesting – but his comments on the economic value of nuclear plants seems particularly germane at this moment in time. Visit the Clean and Safe (CASE) Energy Coalition for more on his current activities.
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And Greenpeace? Constructive as always:
"A Greenpeace activist arrived with a motorized paraglider around 7:40 am (0540 GMT). He flew over the plant, threw a smoke bomb and landed inside, where he was detained," police near the Bugey plant in southeastern France told AFP.
See blog post below for more information on the paragliding story.


Hangliding over Le Bugey. The idea was to show a security breach, but it may well be the French decided not to kill a nitwit (or a regular joe, er, pierre who went drastically off course). In any event, he couldn’t have hurt the containment structure even if he had been explosives laden and blew up against it – something the plant workers also would have known. But zut alors! The workers would sure have a nasty job hosing off the structure afterward.

Comments

jimwg said…
"Hangliding over Le Bugey. The idea was to show a security breach, but it may well be the French decided not to kill a nitwit (or a regular joe, er, pierre who went drastically off course)"

Then, there might be an ulterior reason for this stunt, a'la "Whale Wars" in that Greenpeacde and Greens want a "Kent State" laid at the doorstep of a nuke plant with media-darling "martyrs" shot down by plant security. Bet that they're insane enough to rush the gates of a nuclear plant en mass for such a crazed reason.

James Greenidge
Queens NY
Anonymous said…
It speaks well to the compassion and restraint of the security forces to both recognize that this was a publicity stunt (not much an idiot in a hang glider can do to a nuclear plant with foot-thick concrete walls and a stell containment liner) and not blast the dope's brains out. They could have just as easily blown him out of the sky, but then they'd have the media whining about "brutality". As it is, all they have to deal with is the media whining about "|security lapse". Its lose-lose as far as the plant is concerned.
Anonymous said…
Why do you think Greenpeace® stunts players always emblazon the official Greenpeace® logo on their stuff large enough for police and military personnel to see it?

(anonymous, but usually posts on energy issues as "Dogmudgeon".)
jimwg said…
Re: "Why do you think Greenpeace® stunts players always emblazon the official Greenpeace® logo on their stuff large enough for police and military personnel to see it?"

Right®! That's going to stop U.S. security guards® and police® after the USS Cole®!

James Greenidge
Queens NY

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