Skip to main content

U.S. Nuclear Technology Exports and Africa

The following is a guest post by Ted Jones, Director of International Supplier Relations for NEI.

From August 4-6, heads of state from Africa came to Washington for the 2014 U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit hosted by President Obama. Yesterday, NEI hosted a delegation of African leaders from Niger, Namibia and South Africa to discuss nuclear energy development in their countries. As Africa strives to develop new sources of abundant, clean electricity, nuclear energy holds great promise.
President Mahamadou Issoufo of Niger and Ambassador Maman Sidikou.
Africa’s Power Gap

According to the World Bank. The 48 countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, with a combined population of 800 million, generate roughly the same amount of power as Spain, with a population of only 45 million. Per capita power consumption – just a tenth of what is common elsewhere in the developing world – is actually falling due to lagging development and population growth.

Africa cannot close its power gap with fossil generation without inflicting great harm to the health of its people and environment. Nuclear energy has one of the lowest impacts on the environment of any energy source because it does not emit air pollution, isolates its waste from the environment and requires a relatively small amount of land.

What the U.S. Nuclear Energy Sector Has to Offer

U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy, Daniel Poneman
The United States has much to offer its African partners in nuclear energy development – and more than any other country. More than 60 percent of the world’s 436 operating reactors are based on U.S. technology. Many of the 71 nuclear plants under construction around the world rely on U.S. companies for reactor designs, engineering, precision components, high-performance nuclear fuel and more. So, adoption of U.S. technology in Africa makes terrific sense. There are numerous advantages in deploying U.S. reactor technology and in employing US companies to implement nuclear power development programs:

  • Advanced reactor designs: U.S. companies are at the forefront of developing advanced reactor designs that are even safer and more efficient than our existing fleet of world-class reactors, incorporating modular techniques for easier construction. New designs include large reactors such as the GE Hitachi ABWR, the only Generation III reactor in operation; the Westinghouse AP1000, a Generation III+ design now under construction in the United States and China; and the GE Hitachi ESBWR, another Generation III+ design. In addition, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding through public-private partnerships two U.S. companies to bring small, modular designs into operation by 2022.
  • Services, fuel and components: With a U.S. fleet average capacity factor of approximately 90 percent, U.S. firms lead the world in operational expertise. U.S. companies excel in the full range of nuclear services, including engineering and construction, nuclear fuel services and more. Services for uranium conversion, enrichment and fabrication are available, and substantial new, advanced enrichment capacity is in various stages of technological development and deployment.
  • Excellence in nuclear safety: Based on more than 50 years of experience, the U.S. nuclear industry continues to perform as one of the safest industrial working environments in the world. The U.S. supply chain leads the world in safety-conscious workforce training, operational excellence, and continuous improvement. Regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) – the gold standard for nuclear regulators around the world – U.S. suppliers are known for process excellence, human performance and safety culture. 
Of critical importance for Africa, the U.S. nuclear industry has a proven record in industrial partnership. Around the world, U.S. nuclear companies have worked with partners on technology transfer, localization, education and training, to enable broad and enduring industrial development. As the nations of Africa contemplate a role for nuclear energy in their sustainable development, the United States is ready to be their best partner.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

A Design Team Pictures the Future of Nuclear Energy

For more than 100 years, the shape and location of human settlements has been defined in large part by energy and water. Cities grew up near natural resources like hydropower, and near water for agricultural, industrial and household use.

So what would the world look like with a new generation of small nuclear reactors that could provide abundant, clean energy for electricity, water pumping and desalination and industrial processes?

Hard to say with precision, but Third Way, the non-partisan think tank, asked the design team at the Washington, D.C. office of Gensler & Associates, an architecture and interior design firm that specializes in sustainable projects like a complex that houses the NFL’s Dallas Cowboys. The talented designers saw a blooming desert and a cozy arctic village, an old urban mill re-purposed as an energy producer, a data center that integrates solar panels on its sprawling flat roofs, a naval base and a humming transit hub.

In the converted mill, high temperat…

New Home for Our Blog: Join Us on NEI.org

On February 27, NEI launched the new NEI.org. We overhauled the public site, framing all of our content around the National Nuclear Energy Strategy.

So, what's changed?

Our top priority was to put you, the user, first. Now you can quickly get the information you need. You'll enjoy visiting the site with its intuitive navigation, social media integration and compelling and shareable visuals. We've added a feature called Nuclear Now, which showcases the latest industry news and resources like fact sheets and reports. It's one of the first sections you'll see on our home page and it can be accessed anywhere throughout the site by clicking on the atom symbol in the top right corner of the page.
Most importantly for you, our loyal NEI Nuclear Notes readers, is that we've migrated the blog to the new site. Moving forward, all blog posts will be published in the News section, along with our press releases, Nuclear Energy Overview stories and more. Just look for the &qu…

Hurricane Harvey Couldn't Stop the South Texas Project

As Hurricane Harvey battered southeast Texas over the past week, the devastation and loss of life in its wake have kept our attention and been a cause of grief.

Through the tragedy, many stories of heroics and sacrifice have emerged. Among those who have sacrificed are nearly 250 workers who have been hunkered down at the South Texas Project (STP) nuclear plant in Matagorda County, Texas.

STP’s priorities were always the safety of their employees and the communities they serve. We are proud that STP continued to operate at full power throughout the storm. It is a true testament to the reliability and resiliency of not only the operators but of our industry.

The world is starting to notice what a feat it is to have maintained operations through the catastrophic event. Forbes’ Rod Adams did an excellent job describing the contribution of these men and women:

“STP storm crew members deserve to be proud of the work that they are doing. Their families should take comfort in the fact that…