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Giving Back to the Community With Nuclear Energy

I started my career at Entergy’s Palisades Nuclear Power Plant in Southwest Michigan 11 years ago as a security officer. After seven years, I moved on to become a supervisor of Document Control and Records Management. Now, I’m a senior emergency planner, thanks to the encouragement of my nuclear mentor, Otto Gustafson.

In emergency planning, I’m proud to be on the front lines to ensure the safety of my plant and community. I help organize and facilitate our emergency response organization. I enjoy my job because it allows me to help Palisades be prepared for emergency situations. I know that my coworkers have the knowledge and procedures to secure the plant and keep the community safe, in the case of an emergency. My position challenges me in ways I never dreamed of prior to joining emergency planning and I learn new things every day.

My vision for the future of nuclear is continuing to provide clean energy to my community and state. Nuclear offers great benefits to my community, not just through the economic stability of employing more than 600 people, but also through the many programs that support the community in various ways. I see nuclear continuing to be a huge part of my community and the country as a whole.

I love how my career in nuclear has afforded me the opportunity to give back to my community. I am the president of Entergy Women in Nuclear (WIN) at Palisades. Through WIN, I have participated in Feeding America where we provide food to those in need. Every fall, I help fill 1,200 backpacks that we hand out to underprivileged children. And, I have planned and instructed nuclear activities for two local schools to educate young people about the possibilities of nuclear.

I am bringing innovation into the nuclear energy industry by keeping my eyes open to all opportunities for change. I ensure that all projects I am included on are following proper regulations. I enjoy challenges and strive for superior quality in all of my work. I like to look to other fields and see what can transition to nuclear and keep the path to new ideas fresh.

To me, Delivering the Nuclear Promise is helping define what is necessary to keep nuclear power sustainable, safe, reliable and affordable.

The above post was written by Entergy’s Kelly Howard for the Powered by Our People promotion, which aims to showcase the best and the brightest in the nation’s nuclear energy workforce.

Share this story of nuclear’s benefits with your network using #whynuclear. To learn more, go to nei.org/whynuclear.

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