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Is Mario Cuomo Another Democrat for Nuclear Energy?

Over at DMI Blog, former New York Governor Mario Cuomo has been writing a series of posts on new priorities for progressive politicians. Today, he turned to his suggestions for strengthening the economy, including his ideas for energy policy.

In the nuclear energy business, Cuomo is best known for leading the opposition to the opening of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant on Long Island -- a plant that was complete and ready to begin providing reliable, emission-free electricity to a region that has traditionally paid some of the highest utility rates in the nation.

Which is why the following words come as something of a surprise:
We should also take a fresh look at nuclear energy that uses uranium, a fuel that is available, less expensive and a good replacement for fossil fuels that produce dangerous carbon dioxide emissions. Until now nuclear energy in the United States has been discouraged because the construction technology has been imperfect, siting has been done carelessly and there is not yet a safe and convenient way to dispose of nuclear wastes. If we can find a way to travel to the moon and back we can solve all these technological problems as well, especially since it’s clear that France has been doing it for many years.

Ultimately the use of nuclear power for energy instead of destructiveness should be a vital part of our non-proliferation strategy with Iran, North Korea and other nations.
While Cuomo straddles on enough points here to cover his previous opposition to Shoreham, the statement as a whole -- which seems to include an endorsement of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) or something like it -- is something of a revelation.

I'll be watching for more from the former Governor in this area. Please recall that his son, Andrew, is currently serving as Attorney General for the State of New York.

Comments

Anonymous said…
And Mario's son Andrew, along with Westchester County Commissioner Andy Spano and US Reps Nita Lowey and Mark Green are leading the fight to shut Indian Point down. Let's not forget Hillary who proposed the E-plan siren law that required backup sirens for hi population density areas, and that this affects ONLY Indian Point.

Yes, I am very surprised at Mario's words. Maybe the Dems will turn around. But when I look at Andy Cuomo, Hillary Clinton, Elliot Spitzer and all the rest, I don't see any turn around in attitude.
d kosloff said…
Spitzer needed to make a publicity splash to distract people from the news of his political corruption.
Anonymous said…
Mario Cuomo would sell his first-born to gain political advantage – oh wait, I forgot – he’s already done that!

He bought Shoreham for $1 and passed the $ billions of cost to future generations of New Yorkers to gain the political support of Long Island soccer moms, and to pay off his lawyer cronies. That was after the mob made their $ millions in concrete sales and kick-backs from the trade unions who built the plant.

I feel qualified to judge Cuomo: I lived in NY during the demise of Shoreham, and was subject to more than 20 years of the heavy tax burden that state is famous for.

I will never be able to believe anything that comes out of Mario Cuomo’s mouth, much less an apparent change of tune when it comes to nuclear energy.
Anonymous said…
No matter what Cuomo says now, he is still responsible for wrecking the Shoreham plant. Aside from costing the Northeast about 1000 MW of safe, reliable, emissions-free electricity, he ruined the lives, jobs, and careers of many fine people who were employed at that plant. One of them was an ex-student of mine who was in the C&HP department. The company promised to "take care of him" when they trashed the plant. They did that, alright. They made him a forklift operator on a loading dock. Really good for one's career advancement.

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