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Vroom! It’s the The Nuclear Car!!

3617343993_eaa462c1b3 Today was picture perfect for Newman Wachs Racing at the Harrah’s Autobahn Grand Prix Presented by Mazda. Atlantic Championship drivers John Edwards and Jonathan Summerton finished 1-2 for the first of two races this weekend at the Autobahn Country Club, which is just a short distance from the team’s headquarters in Mundelein. In front of the team’s friends, family members, and nearly 60 employees of team owner Eddie Wachs’ other companies, both drivers performed brilliantly and brought home the team’s first ever one-two result.

And while this is good news for Edwards and Summerton (and Newman Wachs), why mention it here? Because both men were driving the Nuclear Clean Air Energy car, albeit minus a flux capacitor.

Here is co-sponsor Entergy on the car:

Entergy Nuclear is in its second year of the “Nuclear Clean Air Energy” campaign, having reached nearly two million people on the Atlantic Championship Series and across U.S. college campuses during that time. Our goal is to use the race car to gain visibility for our message and as a platform to recruit engineers to this growing, exciting industry.

NEI is another sponsor. It’s a great way to get the nuclear message out. In addition to racing the car, the drivers also visit college campuses with it and help to get racing nut students interested in nuclear engineering as a potential career. (It helps, no doubt, that Edwards is 19.) If you happen to be near the the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course on August 8, stop by to see Edwards and Summerton do their level best to come in first and second – actually, a likelier than not scenario.

Itself. Click the picture to see the message on its side.

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Marty McFly to Doc Brown: You were standing on your toilet, and you were hanging a clock, and you fell, and you hit your head on the sink. And that's when you came up with the idea for the Flux Capacitor.

See? A nuclear car is as easy as that.

Comments

Ray said…
Wait a minute ... the *car* is nuclear powered? Or is it just a car with a nuclear sticker? Because if the former, I'm really wondering why I've not heard of this technology before.
Brian Mays said…
Well, yes it is "nuclear powered," indirectly:

Nuclear processes in the sun produce energy in the form of photons. The photons travel to Earth. They are absorbed by the leaves of plants and the energy enters the biosphere. Various life forms that contain this energy die and are buried. Heat and pressure convert the organic material into complex carbon-hydrogen molecules (assuming that you are not a proponent of the abiotic oil hypothesis, that is). These complex carbon-hydrogen molecules are later extracted from deep within the Earth and are refined into useful fuel. The fuel is pumped into the Nuclear Clean Air Energy car.

Thus, the car is fueled by nuclear energy. Q.E.D.

If you have a problem with that, then I suggest that you be more specific next time. ;-)
Anonymous said…
"Thus, the car is fueled by nuclear energy."

By the same logic, the car is fueled by solar power.

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