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Who Are You? - The Silicon Knows

fortune The internet, as you may have heard, is jam packed with pages that purport to determine your perfect mate, your personality, your life span (based, I guess, on your intake of Omega-3 and asbestos). Typalizor says it will tell you your personality type by analyzing your blog and judging, well, we'd guess word choice.

Here is how Typalizer judged Nuclear Notes (we were really expecting "Psychotic" since it would be taking in the writing of three frequent writers):

INTJ - The Scientists

The long-range thinking and individualistic type. They are especially good at looking at almost anything and figuring out a way of improving it - often with a highly creative and imaginative touch. They are intellectually curious and daring, but might be physically hesitant to try new things.

The Scientists enjoy theoretical work that allows them to use their strong minds and bold creativity. Since they tend to be so abstract and theoretical in their communication they often have a problem communicating their visions to other people and need to learn patience and use concrete examples. Since they are extremely good at concentrating they often have no trouble working alone.

Well, that makes sense, all things considered, and about what you'd expect to hear from an exceptionally good urban fortune teller. (We think it's actually the Meyer-Briggs test, but a good fortune teller will know his way around that, too).

However, it really does seem to come down to word choice - the subject of this blog has rather skewed the results, we think. If you have a general interest blog or online journal, try it out.

I once ran into a startlingly good tarot card reader on an Amtrak train. She went way beyond the boilerplate that you expect fortune tellers to dole out. And that's how, when the gag works, it really works.

Comments

Gwyneth Cravens said…
"Since they tend to be so abstract and theoretical in their communication they often have a problem communicating their visions to other people and need to learn patience and use concrete examples."

When I give talks to the tech community about ways to help the general public better understand nuclear power, I say the same thing.

And I add a warning to avoid acronyms. (Hint to The Silicon.)

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