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Serious Topics, Dry Wit

In a comprehensive, fascinating interview Thursday in sunny Idaho Falls with Idaho Samizdat, Dr. Dale Klein, longtime NRC commissioner and its onetime chairman, discussed rabbits in the context of public communication, cheeses, small reactors, Yucca Mountain, bozos, Blackberries, and business.

Serious quote:
The U.S. has difficulty thinking clearly about how to make long-term capital commitments. The financing profile for a new nuclear reactor is now 60-80 years. Our grandchildren will benefit from them and some will operate them.
Witty ones:
In response to a question at the lunch meeting about the reason France has such a strong commitment to nuclear energy, he quipped, ‘That nation's energy polices come down to just four factors: no oil, no gas, no coal, and no choice.’
and
Klein is frustrated by people who have already made up their minds about the license application. Referring to the massive electronic document library that supports the project, he said ironically, "anyone who says Yucca Mountain is unsafe must be a speed reader."

Comments

Ioannes said…
So why did Obamolech demote pro-nuclear Dale Klein and promote anti-nuclear Jackzo? Remember, NEI, you were the guys who wanted Harry Reid's Jackzo balanced out by Pete Domineci's Peter Lyons when Bush was forced to compromise with the devil. Now Lyons is gone, and nothing stands in the way of over-regulating the industry until new nukes are too expensive to build.

McCain wanted to build 40 new nukes rightaway. Instead we got cash for clunkers from Obamessiah.
David Bradish said…
Fact 1: It is customary for Chairmen of federal agencies to be from the same party that's in office. Thus, the reason for the switch to Jaczko. The fact that it took five months before the commissioners switched was a sign that Obama was fine with a Republican running the NRC for a bit.

Fact 2: The two nominees to the NRC (by the Obama Administration) are pro-nuclear and "welcomed by the industry."

Fact 3: Obama gave us cash clunkers, he also gave us Secretary Chu. Check out what Chu said last week.

Like I asked several months ago, how about we get you on board with trying to educate the Democrats on the benefits of nuclear so we could bring them on our side instead of always complaining about them?
Anonymous said…
"McCain wanted to build 40 new nukes rightaway."

With their containment structures magically formed for free from the hot air of his stump speeches, no doubt.

Talk is cheap, especially when it's campaign rhetoric.

What's stopping SENATOR McCain from proposing legislation to do exactly this, if he's TRULY so committed to it?
Chad said…
Unfortunately, loannes is more motivated by his political beliefs not relating to nuclear power to the point where he smears Obama on nuclear power to convince others to be anti-Obama.

This is just an example on how nuclear power is a victim of the polarization of our Country.
D Kosloff said…
Anonymous,

How much power do you think that McCain has in a Senate of 99 with 59 Democrats?
Anonymous said…
"How much power do you think that McCain has in a Senate of 99 with 59 Democrats?"

First, you're inaccurately assuming that all Democratic MoCs are anti-nuclear power. In fact, the Democratic House whip, Jim Clyburn, is heading up a rather large coalition of pronuclear Dems to support new nuclear. Gotta read the news occasionally, rather than relying on political prejudices.

Second, McCain, to my knowledge, never introduced legislation to build NPPs, let alone 40-100, even before the Democratic majority controlled Congress. Only time he got that religion was when he needed it for his presidential campaign.

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