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Something Wrong With Greenpeace’s Comment Section At Their Anti-Nuclear Blog?

Nuclear Fissionary noted that no-one can submit comments anymore at the Nuclear Reaction blog:

I have left numerous comments on their pseudo-scientific website. I’ve also used the Nuclear Fissionary Page on Facebook to direct our readers to the Greenpeace site to make sure their antinuclear rants don’t go unanswered.

Well, it would appear that Greenpeace no longer has the stomach for debate.

While visiting the site the other day I noticed that my comments were gone. Every blogger knows that deleting comments is unethical, so I thought that GP had just decided to silence me. But then I noticed that there were no other comments either. What’s more, there was no box where readers could add to the ‘dialogue’ of the nuclear debate. The comments were just gone.

Unless there’s a technical issue with the blog, I would say this action pretty much speaks for itself.

Update 3/31/10 - Apparently they suffered a spam attack and the comments are now back on. Hmm...

Comments

Anonymous said…
"Every blogger knows that deleting comments is unethical"

That's not true at all. It's perfectly acceptable to delete posts that are obscene, libelous, threatening, etc.

I assume you meant to say that deleting comments simply because the blogger doesn't agree with them is unethical? If that's the point, I agree.

Let's wait to find out why comments are no longer allowed before jumping the gun. And I applaud NEI for (usually) posting comments from both supporters and opponents of nuclear power.
Anonymous said…
Well, while comments at the Greenpeace blog may or may not be disabled permanently, I think some of the other evidence on the page is a real tribute to the way the international nuclear industry is out-organizing Greenpeace and other anti-nukes online. I took a look at their blogroll and it only has seven links. One of those is another Greenpeace blog and still another is just a link to a snarky Google search.

If they have disabled comments, it's because pro-nuclear energy activists aren't going to let them get off the mat.
No comment ;) said…
Greenpeace does allow comments on its other blogs. So I posted some comments to those blogs, pointing to the fact that Greenpeace does not allow comments on nuclear-energy related topics. I'll bet that they'll censor these comments too...
Sterling Archer said…
Every blogger knows that deleting comments is unethical

Don't agree -- a blog is the owner's sandbox, they're in charge. Deleting comments might be counterproductive, but it's hardly unethical.
Finrod said…
Email from Greenpeace:

Dear Craig,

Nuclear Reaction’s comments have been turned off over the last few days. We had to take this step after the site suffered a large spam attack. We apologise for not announcing this at the time but we’ve been a little busy clearing out the junk comments and waiting for the attack to fade away.
Comments are now back on so feel free to have your say.

In the meantime, Nuclear Reaction will be getting a redesign in the next week or so and we’ll be using a new commenting system.

Kind regards,

Karen Gallagher
Public Outreach and Information
Greenpeace International
Ottho Heldringstraat 5
1066 AZ Amsterdam
The Netherlands
+31 (0) 20 718 2000

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