Friday, May 14, 2010

Hungry?

Those of you interested in learning more about the myths and reality of "green" energy will want to put the book Power Hungry on your summer reading list. Written by Robert Bryce, editor of the Energy Tribune web site, the book describes the "cold facts" of our power needs. Bryce explores 13 myths about energy on topics ranging from wind and solar to cellulosic ethanol and electric cars.

As others on this blog have made clear, we believe the nation's energy needs require us to pursue all options. Toward that end, we think it important to be clear about the facts and trade-offs involved in energy policy choices. (An illustration of just one of those trade-offs - the amount of land required to replace nuclear generation - is provided on the NEI web site here.) In Power Hungry, Robert Bryce has attempted to share what he has learned about those facts and trade-offs that sometimes does not fit the media "template". We commend it to your reading.

A Wall Street Journal review of Power Hungry is available here.

2 comments:

DocForesight said...

I first read some excerpts from Robert Bryce's "Power Hungry" at www.masterresource.org where there is also a current series on Power Density by Dr. Vaclav Smil (5-part series). Both series go into the number crunching that leaves diffuse energy sources severely wanting compared to nuclear power.

Also, the gents at www.cleanenergyinsight.org have compiled some informative Fact Sheets and posts.

If we are to pursue an "all of the above" approach to energy supply, let's at least be honest about the materials input, the land-use footprint, the on-demand factor and the scalability of each before throwing more money at a losing horse. Bangladesh is not the going wind and solar route - they're going with Russian nukes (BN-800).

Fred said...

Can't wait to read the book! Most energy analysts agree: any viable U.S. Energy policy for the next few decades must include a combination of:
1. Consumption, Conservation and energy efficiency
2. Fossil Fuels-Oil, natural gas and coal
3. Nuclear
4. Renewables-wind, solar, ocean, biofuels, etc.
5. Geothermal, hydro, etc.