Wednesday, January 09, 2013

The FLEX Solution: America's Nuclear Industry Responds to Fukushima

Earlier today, the Nuclear Energy Institute released a five-minute video explaining the comprehensive and tailored response strategy that it is implementing across the industry to enhance nuclear plant safety in the face of extreme natural events.

To produce the high-definition video, NEI acquired first-of-its kind footage of the deployment of new emergency response equipment at U.S. nuclear energy facilities. The video also features animation and interviews with industry leaders and technical staff discussing nuclear plant safety.


The diverse and flexible (“FLEX”) response strategy developed by industry addresses the major challenges encountered at the Fukushima Daiichi power station following the March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami: the loss of power to maintain effective reactor fuel cooling.

Additional on-site portable equipment is being acquired to help ensure that every U.S. nuclear energy facility can respond safely to extreme events, no matter what the cause. The equipment ranges from diesel-driven pumps and electric generators to ventilation fans, hoses, fittings, cables and satellite communications gear. It also includes support materials for emergency responders. For additional information concerning how the American nuclear energy is applying lessons learned from Fukushima, please visit the Fukushima response section of NEI.org.

2 comments:

gmax137 said...

Does NEI have any plans to get this video shown on TV? Sure would be nice to see that happen. Professionally done, factual, with some nice scenes in & around the plants where the average person can't go. This is the kind of stuff NEI needs to be doing.

jimwg said...


Yes, such enormous emergency resources being mobilized, but how much is really necessary if there's a large portion remedy? The NRC should push the envelope and think outside the box and seriously examine the idea of nuclear plants supplying their own standard and emergency power "off the grid" like nuclear vessels long have, even just as an backup "option".

James Greenidge
Queens NY