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Standing for Energy

westandforenergyWe Stand for Energy is a very promising attempt to link energy and electricity advocates, professionals, students and other interested parties into a social network centered around energy policy. Along with the web site, there is a Facebook page and Twitter (@WeStand4Energy) presence.

This is the list of interests:

We’re Americans from all walks of life who believe our nation’s energy policies MUST:

  • Help support and create local jobs
  • Keep our local communities and economy growing
  • Spur the development of new, innovative technologies
  • Ensure electricity remains reliable, affordable, and increasingly clean
  • Provide a secure energy future for everyone
  • Protect consumers and ensure everyone is treated fairly

These are clearly meant as a starting point and will likely develop over time as it become clearer where the members’ interests lie. Obviously, it would be good to establish nuclear energy as having a valid claim on those statements, and a little less obviously, to represent the atom as a member of the energy family in good standing types. So even though the site’s scope is broad, the nuclear energy community’s interest in energy diversity is equally expansive – a pretty good match, I’d say.

So head over there, see if you find it agreeable and sign up if you do. There are a lot of mailing lists and Google circles about nuclear energy, but nothing quite like this. It’s worth supporting.


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