Skip to main content

A Cornucopia of Nuclear Notes

Cornucopia-Print-C10353551 One of the themes – or is that memes – we’ve been following here is the growing support for nuclear energy among Congressional Democrats. We might be expected to consider nuclear energy a post-partisan issue – that is, one where Republicans and Democrats more-or-less agree on its value generally if not always in detail – but this reality is beginning to penetrate the wider media world.

Consider this piece by U.S. News and World Report’s Kent Garber:

Sen. Barbara Boxer, a liberal California Democrat, has included a whole set of goodies for nuclear energy in her climate bill in an effort to win Republicans' and moderate Democrats' support. Democratic Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts, the bill's cosponsor, recently penned an op-ed with South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham calling for expanding the industry.

And earlier this month, Democratic Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia and Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee proposed legislation to double the U.S. production of nuclear power in the next 20 years.

There’s more, including the climate change component of Democrat’s increasing support of nuclear energy. We’d add that polls show pretty broad support for nuclear and if there’s one thing politicians follow, it’s polls.

We were amused by this:

This calculation is outraging many of the administration's environmental-minded supporters…

A fair number of environmental activists are seeing the benefits of nuclear energy, too. Maybe Garber can do a story on them next.

---

Tunisia is having a meeting on the future of energy in its corner of Africa. We may have thought the best solution obvious – lots of sun down Tunisia way – and solar may be the energy winner ultimately, but we’ll take our chances:

The meeting will also examine the use of cogeneration in the industrial sector, as well as the prospects for the use of nuclear energy in Tunisia following agreements signed in 2008 with France, for the setting up of an electric-nuclear plant in Tunisia by 2020.

Here’s a brief bit about the Tunisian National Committee of Atomic Energy – sounds like the country is pretty serious.

---

Consider this headline:

DOE chief visits SC, touts nuclear and green power

This comes from an AP account in The Sun News (in Myrtle Beach? -the site doesn’t say). It continues:

[DOE Secretary Steven] Chu attended a morning groundbreaking at the Savannah River Site for a facility that will burn leftover wood products to create steam. Then, during an afternoon tour of a Greenville plant that makes turbines, he reminded reporters that President Barack Obama is committed to expanding nuclear power.

And:

Chu then headed to Greenville where he toured a General Electric plant, where 3,000 workers build gas and wind-powered turbines.

The Obama "administration is very supportive of nuclear energy," Chu said, according to The Greenville News.

Given the places he was visiting, it sounds like he was asked questions about nuclear energy rather than offering comments spontaneously. Which, if true, shows where the reporters’ curiosity lies and that Chu might find himself saying a fair amount about nuclear energy whatever the venue. Oh, and here’s The Greenville News’ account referenced above. It explains why Chu was in North Carolina:

Chu’s visit came one week after the Energy Department announced that it had picked Clemson to receive the biggest research grant in the school’s history — $45 million to develop a testing center for wind turbine drive trains in North Charleston.

And yet a fair amount of nuclear interest here, too. Hmmm!

Blame it on the Greeks. It seems there was this goat, Amalthea, the wet nurse to Zeus, who broke off a horn while rough housing with her charge. Aggrieved, Zeus replaced it with a magical horn that could dispense whatever anyone wanted. We’re not sure how it became associated with Thanksgiving.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Whatever happened to Chu's Blue Ribbon Panel on spent fuel storage? Did it get McChrystaled?
David Bradish said…
I've been hearing a lot of chatter lately (nothing official yet) that we should be hearing something about the blue ribbon panel before the end of the year. Here's what Energy Daily said last week:

Sources say the Energy Department plans to name former Indiana congressman Lee Hamilton and former National Security Advisor Brent Scowcroft as co-chairs of the Obama administration’s "blue-ribbon panel."
Chris Dembia said…
I work for GE in Greenville and I was actually listening to Chu right there. Only one reporter asked questions, the reporter from the Greenville News, and his questions were about the administration's stance on nuclear energy and what the plan was about nuclear waste since Yucca has been canned. Chu actually spoke for a couple of minutes about nuclear, especially with the waste issue. He even started to get technical with his answer. He did talk about the DOE's blue ribbon panel.

He, and the senator there with him, also spoke spontaneously and briefly about nuclear energy.

Popular posts from this blog

Making Clouds for a Living

Donell Banks works at Southern Nuclear’s Plant Vogtle units 3 and 4 as a shift supervisor in Operations, but is in the process of transitioning to his newly appointed role as the daily work controls manager. He has been in the nuclear energy industry for about 11 years.

I love what I do because I have the unique opportunity to help shape the direction and influence the culture for the future of nuclear power in the United States. Every single day presents a new challenge, but I wouldn't have it any other way. As a shift supervisor, I was primarily responsible for managing the development of procedures and programs to support operation of the first new nuclear units in the United States in more than 30 years. As the daily work controls manager, I will be responsible for oversight of the execution and scheduling of daily work to ensure organizational readiness to operate the new units.

I envision a nuclear energy industry that leverages the technology of today to improve efficiency…

Nuclear: Energy for All Political Seasons

The electoral college will soon confirm a surprise election result, Donald Trump. However, in the electricity world, there are fewer surprises – physics and economics will continue to apply, and Republicans and Democrats are going to find a lot to like about nuclear energy over the next four years.

In a Trump administration, the carbon conversation is going to be less prominent. But the nuclear value proposition is still there. We bring steady jobs to rural areas, including in the Rust Belt, which put Donald Trump in office. Nuclear plants keep the surrounding communities vibrant.

We hold down electricity costs for the whole economy. We provide energy diversity, reducing the risk of disruption. We are a critical part of America’s industrial infrastructure, and the importance of infrastructure is something that President-Elect Trump has stressed.

One of our infrastructure challenges is natural gas pipelines, which have gotten more congested as extremely low gas prices have pulled m…

Innovation Fuels the Nuclear Legacy: Southern Nuclear Employees Share Their Stories

Blake Bolt and Sharimar Colon are excited about nuclear energy. Each works at Southern Nuclear Co. and sees firsthand how their ingenuity powers the nation’s largest supply of clean energy. For Powered by Our People, they shared their stories of advocacy, innovation in the workplace and efforts to promote efficiency. Their passion for nuclear energy casts a bright future for the industry.

Blake Bolt has worked in the nuclear industry for six years and is currently the work week manager at Hatch Nuclear Plant in Georgia. He takes pride in an industry he might one day pass on to his children.

What is your job and why do you enjoy doing it?
As a Work Week Manager at Plant Hatch, my primary responsibility is to ensure nuclear safety and manage the risk associated with work by planning, scheduling, preparing and executing work to maximize the availability and reliability of station equipment and systems. I love my job because it enables me to work directly with every department on the plant…