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The U.N. Climate Change Conference

377852-Nyhaven-Canal-Copenhagen-0 Have you heard?

A much-anticipated global meeting of nearly 200 nations — all seeking what has so far been elusive common ground on the issue of climate change — began [in Copenhagen] on Monday with an impassioned airing of what leaders here called the political and moral imperatives at hand.

This is the United Nations Climate Change conference (or COP15), being held today through the 18th. We expect to have a lot more to say about the conference as it rolls along. In addition to our posts and our tracking events through Twitter (see our right-hand column if you don’t want to add us to your twitter feed), we will also receive dispatches from Paul Genoa, NEI’s director of policy development, who is on the ground in Copenhagen. Mr. Genoa will also be posting over at The National Journal’s Copenhagen Insider blog.

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To get started, though, let’s point to some resources you find helpful in following the conference,

The Conference home page and a direct link to its news page. Here’s the top news right now:

An official says President Barack Obama plans to talk with former Vice President Al Gore at the White House on Monday as the president prepares for his appearance at a major international climate summit in Copenhagen.

Apparently, though, this is a private meeting – it makes sense that they’d talk, given that Gore won the Nobel Prize for his work on climate change.

Here’s the U.N.’s official page.

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Here is the U.S.’s official Web site. It’s a little bare, but does include a page that allows you to follow the conference via the current most popular networking sites. The Twitter feed for the conference is here, although currently Twitter is suffering a bit of an outage.

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For some video, take a look at the Clean Skies Network and OneClimate.net, both of which are covering the conference.

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And finally, there’s NEI’s pages on Copenhagen. We’ll be posting various additional links and relevant nuclear info as it becomes available.

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There! That’ll get you started.

The Nyhaven Canal in Copenhagen. If you follow some of the links you’ll see a lot of shots of the conference center, so we chose something else. After all, the Danes expect a lot of strolling around their lovely city – why not start at the Nyhaven Canal?

Comments

Ioannes said…
You have completely ignored the East Anglia scandal where so-called scientists removed data that demonstrated climate warming due to human activities is NOT happening. You guys are supposed to be nuclear professionals dedicated to the truth. Obviously that isn't the case. Liberalism reigns supreme and you will do whatever it takes to serve your messiah Obamolech.
David Bradish said…
Last time I checked Ioannes, the science was still out on climate change. It's a bit premature for you to claim it's not happening based on one organization's lack of integrity. There are a lot of people and organizations studying this issue besides East Anglia.

Liberalism reigns supreme and you will do whatever it takes to serve your messiah Obamolech.

Grow up.

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