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Reid Release on Yucca Mountain Legislation

From the office of Senator Harry Reid:
Today U.S. Senators Harry Reid and John Ensign of Nevada introduced bipartisan legislation that would require nuclear waste to be stored at the facilities where it is produced. The Federal Accountability for Nuclear Waste Storage Act of 2007 would eliminate the need for the proposed Yucca Mountain Project.

"As elected leaders, we have a moral responsibility to protect the thousands of Nevadans and millions of Americans that could be put in harm's way because of projects like proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste dump," said Reid. "This isn't just a Nevada issue, it's a national issue. It would be dangerous and irresponsible to ship the most dangerous substance known to man through cities and small towns, and past schools, hospitals and businesses so it could be buried 90 miles outside of Las Vegas. The next step forward is to secure nuclear waste in scientifically sound ways at the sites where it is produced. This legislation will accomplish that."

"This bill provides a safe, responsible, common sense way to dispose of nuclear waste," said Ensign. "We must look for long-term innovative solutions to recycle waste produced by nuclear power, and as we look for these solutions, we should not transport dangerous waste through cities and rural areas across our nation to Yucca Mountain."

The bill would also require the federal government to take responsibility for possession, stewardship, maintenance, and monitoring of the waste and increase safety at all nuclear power plants by providing funding for additional security to guard against accidents or terrorist attack.
For the NEI statement on the said legislation, click here.

UPDATE: Thanks to my friend Kelly Taylor for passing along this link to a feature at MSNBC. Be sure to read it all, and take time for the companion video as well.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Please pass the vomit bag.
Brian Mays said…
Agreed. I want to puke when anyone invokes the terms "moral responsibility" or "most dangerous substance known to man."

But then again, they are politicians. It is in their nature to lie.
don kosloff said…
Perhaps Reid and Ensign should also require that all human waste be stored at the facility where it is produced. For example, casinos. If that is impractical, perhaps they should require that all coal waste be stored at the facility where it is produced. Why single out nuclear power?
Kelly L. Taylor said…
At the bottom of that MSNBC article is a well-done interactive piece that will help give you a mental picture of what the Yucca Mountain project is designed to look like. I've never been to Yucca Mountain, so I found it pretty informative.
Anonymous said…
The Reid proposal is silly and unworkable. The idea is to try to tap into the Nuclear Waste Fund, which cannot be used to pay for on-site storage, by having a separate contractor run the on-site storage system. Then one ends up with two independent, highly armed security forces on the same site, two maintenance staff, etc. A really stupid idea. The thing to do is for DOE to get the license application in for Yucca Mountain, for the NRC to review it, and as is likely get a construction license. The NRC review is independent and detailed, and it will assure that the repository is based on sound science. Once there is a construction license, it will become increasingly difficult for Senator Reid to claim that the site is not suitable for use as a nuclear waste repository.

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