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Rep. Dingell at the Detroit Economic Club

Earlier today, Rep. John Dingell (D-MI) gave a speech at the Detroit Economic Club entitled, "Strengthening Our Economy & Protecting Our Environment: An Update from Capitol Hill". The Wall Street Journal reports:
At a Detroit Economic Club luncheon, Mr. Dingell, a Michigan Democrat and chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, said he is determined to craft an economy-wide "cap-and-trade" policy to reduce carbon-dioxide emissions and that it is time to ask whether the federal mileage regime, known as Corporate Average Fuel Economy, or CAFE, "does, will or can do the job it was meant to address."

Instead of focusing on CAFE, Mr. Dingell in his prepared remarks proposed crafting legislation that spreads the emissions-regulation burden "evenly and equally," among several industries, including oil companies and electric utilities.
Standing by on a transcript from Rep. Dingell's office. Meanwhile, back in Washington...

Earlier this year at the same podium, DTE Energy President and CEO Tony Earley gave a speech on the future of nuclear energy.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Rep. Dingell's speech may be found at:

< http://energycommerce.house.gov/Press_110/110st51.shtml >

He mentions nuclear energy only once, and in relation to coal:

"Second, we are going to have to address the role of coal. I’ve heard a lot of concerns about the environmental impact of coal. I’m also reminded by my friends from coal country that the US is the Saudi Arabia of coal. That’s a tension we will have to resolve. I expect a similarly vigorous discussion about the role of nuclear energy."

Regards,

Paul Primavera

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