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From the NEI Clip File

Here are some of the news clips we're reading at NEI today. In an editorial on cutting greenhouse gas emissions, the East Valley Tribune has some specific advice for Governor Janet Napolitano:
First, strongly recommend that the next nuclear power plant that is built in this country be located in Arizona. With the technological advances of the past 30 years, this is arguably the most environmentally friendly source of energy available.
In Georgia, Southern Company had some interesting things to say about the plant site at Vogtle:
Southern Co.'s first new nuclear power plant in decades will likely sit on the Plant Vogtle site along the Savannah River near Waynesboro, if the energy giant decides to build one.

That's where Southern has been performing the tests needed to apply for an initial permit for a new nuclear plant, Southern Nuclear spokesman Steve Higginbottom confirmed Wednesday.
In New Mexico, the NRC has scheduled an environmental and safety hearing on Louisiana Energy Service's application to build and operate a uranium enrichment facility.

And finally, the AP has run a wire story on China's grand plans for nuclear energy:
QINSHAN, China - The shadows of Chernobyl and Three Mile Island no longer reach to the pine-crested hillsides of Hangzhou Bay, where China is rushing to expand a nuclear power station to meet soaring demand for electricity for its economic boom.

Driven by crushing fuel shortages, smog and ambitions to profit from its hard-won nuclear prowess, Beijing has embarked on a quest to more than double its nuclear power generating capacity by 2020.

The push for more nuclear power means opportunities for U.S., French and Russian technology suppliers that are competing for up to $8 billion in contracts for two new nuclear power plants - the biggest deals in years for the industry.
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