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Bob Geldof: "To really help the planet, we have to go nuclear, fast."


Over in the U.K., former rocker Bob Geldof isn't shying away from sporting his pro-nuclear energy credentials at a blog sponsored by Lexus on hybrid vehicles. From The Guardian:
Luxury car maker Lexus may have got more than it bargained for when it signed up Bob Geldof to take part in a blog debate about the green credentials of its hybrid models.

Geldof, as well as talking about hybrid cars, airs his views on climate change, branding renewable energy initiatives such as wind farms "Mickey Mouse" and insisting "to really help the planet, we have to go nuclear, fast".

[...]

On the wider question of making an impact on climate change he said: "We may mess around with wind and waves and other renewable energy sources, trying to make them sustainable, but they're not. They're Mickey Mouse ... but to really help the planet, we have to go nuclear, fast."

Geldof added: "In the UK, we'll soon have to scramble for more nuclear power. On this issue, I don't care what anyone says: we're going to go with it, big time."
After taking a look at Geldof's entries at the blog, it's clear he's done plenty of reading on his own -- including a bit of time reviewing the work of James Lovelock. For his entry where he endorses nuclear energy, click here. For all of his entries, click here. For the main page of the Lexus blog, click here.

Comments

Anonymous said…
so, when aging rock stars (Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne and Graham Nash) OPPOSE nuclear power, they're slammed as burned-out, no-nothing hippies in this blog...but they're visionaries when they support nukes(like Geldof)?
Anonymous said…
This is tremendous news. I've always felt the turnaround would come in earnest when celebrities endorse nuclear power. We could use a bigger celebrity than this (Bono would be tops), but Bob Geldof will do. He's regarded as honest and learned, and he's done some extraordinary charity work. Noone, not even Bonnie Raitt or Jackson Brown, can doubt his sincerity.
Anonymous said…
I see you're still not always posting comments if they don't agree with you. I'll try again today. Please post this comment.

Why is it that this blog insults and belittles such anti-nuclear musicians as Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Brown, and Graham Nash when they take public stances, but cites Bob Geldof favorably when he goes pro-nuclear? What makes him an energy expert when they're just "aging rockers," in your terms?
David Bradish said…
To the third Anonymous,

"I see you're still not always posting comments if they don't agree with you. I'll try again today. Please post this comment."

Considering its Christmas time, there are quite a few of us who actually take time off from the blog. If you noticed over the past few days, no comments have been appearing. But next time some of us take vacation, we'll consider shortening it so we can approve an anonymous comment.

"Why is it that this blog insults and belittles such anti-nuclear musicians"

I didn't know "aging rockers" was an insult. If that's your definition of belittling then maybe blogging isn't your thing.

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