Tuesday, March 25, 2008

The Enemy of My Enemy

One of the odder bits of news involves "Europe's last dictator," Alexander Lukashenko of Balarus, is pursuing a pact with Iran to build a nuclear power plant - odd, because it seems unlikely to occur.

David Marples, a Belarus expert at the University of Alberta, doubts that Iran could afford to finance a project that is likely to run much higher than, perhaps even double the amount of, the officially projected $4-5 billion. “It would be an enormous commitment from Iran,” he said and pointed to Russia as the more likely nuclear partner.

Likely an announcement meant to spark a bit of amusement in diplomatic circles or perhaps stir up some mischief for Washington, the net effect is nil. Doubtful that a saber will even be unsheathed much less rattled.

3 comments:

gunter said...

... in part because of the tremendous ongoing remediation costs from Chernobyl fallout.

Dr. David Marples is an recognized expert on the economic fallout in Belarus and Ukraine from the 1986 catastrophe.

Anonymous said...

Gunter,

How many times do you have to be told that a Chernobyl event can never occur at any Western light water reactor?

Why do you keep bringing up the failure of a mad socialist design?

Anonymous said...

At current world oil prices, Iran's government has a daily income of a bit more that $250 million.

Building a 1000 MWe nuclear plant offers the potential of freeing up another 40,000 barrels of oil per day worth about $4 million per day on the open market. (Iran DOES burn oil for electrical power, unlike the US.)

Why would it be difficult for them to finance a new nuclear power plant? If they choose the right partner, the total cost for the plant might be far less than the same plant in the western world simply because protests and lawsuits against government decisions are not tolerated. (Not that I favor such dictatorial decision making, but it does have advantages.)