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Jeb Bush on Nuclear Power

The former Florida governor and CASE Coalition member shares his thoughts:
"Change" seems to be the operative word this election season. It's on the lips of political contenders and on the minds of the voters. But politics isn't the only arena where change is in the air. Change is happening in the world of energy as well, specifically when it comes to nuclear energy.

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There are now 104 nuclear power reactors in the United States that are safely producing 20 percent of the nation's electricity - notably, without producing any of the harmful greenhouse gases some believe to be a major factor in climate change. Americans are beginning to recognize that nuclear energy caters to both our lifestyle and our greening mentality. And it offers the most proven means for our country to achieve much needed energy security.

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American are demanding changes in energy production and the utilities are listening - there are 31 new nuclear power plants on the drawing board to be built over the next 15 to 20 years. Three of those are proposed for Florida.

It's good news for Florida. In 2006, Florida's five nuclear power reactors prevented the emission of 54,800 tons of sulfur dioxide; 39,000 tones of nitrogen oxide; and 22 million metric tons of carbon dioxide. Avoiding nitrogen oxide at this level is the equivalent of taking 2 million passenger cars off the road.

That's a change for the better and it comes at the right time.

By 2030 the South Atlantic Grid is expected to require 26 percent more energy than it produced in 2006. And nationally, the numbers are even higher. As a country, we will need 40 percent more electricity to power our way of life by 2030.

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It is time to shine a little light on this critical sea change, which has produced energy's comeback kid - nuclear power. It has my vote.

Comments

Anonymous said…
The only thing bad about nuclear power is that it doesn't produce plant food (carbon dioxide).
Gunter said…
Interestingly enough, its FPL own filings to the Florida Public Service Commission that show why nuclear power is the least economicly viable option for 21st Century energy policy.

The projected total overnight cost (no financing charges) for construction for an ABWR is between $5500 and $8100 per kilowatt of capacity between $9- $12 billion per unit. And they haven't even put a shovel in the ground.

It is exhobidant construction costs like this that reframe the so-called "renaissance" to be more akin to a relapse to the
1970's. Of more concern, to allow such a heist jeporadizes our chances at abating rapid climate change.
David Bradish said…
Gunter,

Page 11 on FP&L's "Petition to Determine Need for Turkey Point" states:

"FPL’s analysis shows that for all of the scenarios evaluated (eight of nine), the addition of new nuclear capacity is economically superior versus the corresponding addition of new CC units required to provide the same power output, yielding large direct economic benefits to customers as well as effectively addressing the criteria of section 403.519(4)(b). In fact, in the only scenario in which nuclear is not clearly superior, the natural gas prices are significantly lower than they are today and there are zero future economic compliance costs for CO2 emissions. Of all the scenarios evaluated, FPL believes these two to be the most unlikely. Moreover, even in these two unlikely scenarios, the results of the analysis show nuclear to be competitive or only slightly disadvantaged economically, while retaining the non-quantified advantages of fuel diversity, fuel supply reliability, and energy independence. Based on all the information available today, it is clearly desirable to take the steps and make the expenditures necessary to retain the option of new nuclear capacity coming on line in 2018."

FPL estimates on page 30 of the report that nuclear's construction cost estimate is $3,108 to $4,540/kW.

Are you sure you are referring to the correct FPL report?

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