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John McCain on Nuclear Energy


Here's John McCain on nuclear energy:
My fellow Americans, when I'm president, we're going to embark on the most ambitious national project in decades. We are going to stop sending $700 billion a year to countries that don't like us very much. We will attack the problem on every front. We will produce more energy at home. We will drill new wells offshore, and we'll drill them now. We will build more nuclear power plants. We will develop clean coal technology. We will increase the use of wind, tide, solar and natural gas. We will encourage the development and use of flex fuel, hybrid and electric automobiles.

Sen. Obama thinks we can achieve energy independence without more drilling and without more nuclear power. But Americans know better than that. We must use all resources and develop all technologies necessary to rescue our economy from the damage caused by rising oil prices and to restore the health of our planet. It's an ambitious plan, but Americans are ambitious by nature, and we have faced greater challenges. It's time for us to show the world again how Americans lead.

There you are. You can now read all four candidates on nuclear energy (Obama, Biden, Palin). Of course, none of us are single-issue voters, but now you can decide who suits your nuclear tastes best. On to Mississippi and the first debate!

Picture of John McCain. That's a flag image behind him.

Comments

Mike Sivertsen said…
‘When you tell people that 70 years of electricity for a typical four-bedroom family home leaves just one Coke can full of [high-level nuclear] waste, they are impressed and reassured. And all the waste from the whole US civilian nuclear power programme over the last 49 years would cover just one football field, about twenty feet high. Compare that to the trillions of tons of carbon waste and chemicals released into the atmosphere from fossil fuels – not to mention 5,000 people killed in coal mining accidents every year.’

Brazil’s experience in 2001 provides both comfort and guidance. By taking on misrepresentations, misunderstanding and lies and exposing the dishonest tactics of Greenpeace on many issues, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Association undermined the credibility of a campaign against a new nuclear power plant. Pro-nuclear groups got their facts right and ran a well-organised campaign. By the end, the president of Greenpeace was forced out, its ‘aura of credibility’ was destroyed and the organisation simply ceased to campaign against nuclear power in Brazil for over five years.

Source:
Energy: the answer is not blowing in the wind, Dec 2007

http://www.spiked-online.com/index.php?/site/article/4173/
Ray Lightning said…
Drilling on offshore+arctic together will show results after 5 years and will produce a maximum of 80 million barrels per year (which is 1/20th of US oil imports of 1500 million barrels per year). How does McCain intend to solve the remaining 19/20th of the problem ? And prevent the flight of the remaining 665 billion dollars (out of a total of 700 billion dollars) to the middle east. Vaguely mentioning nuclear, clean coal blah blah does not amount to a solution.

Drilling for more is not even a stop-gap solution. It is a completely insignificant 1/20th of the solution.

The statement that Obama opposes nuclear energy is a lie. Obama has clearly mentioned that he welcomes safe nuclear power, and that he wants to invest significant amount of money in re-using nuclear waste. The second part is not mentioned at all by McCain. So, the clear difference between McCain and Obama is that McCain has no plans on breeder reactors, fuel reprocessing etc..

Once-through U235 nuclear reactors can power our society for not more than 60 years.

If you care about cheap and sustainable energy, vote for Obama.
D. Kosloff said…
Ray,

We already have safe nuclear power. Did Senator Obama welcome it from his elementary school?

Where are Senator Obama's plans for building breeder reactors?

Where are Senator Obama's plans for reprocessing?

Of course voting for Senator Obama or Senator McCain will not address anybody's cares about having cheap energy.

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It's all around us. You can't feel it. Smell it. Or taste it.
But it's there all the same. And if you look close enough, you can see all the amazing and wondrous things it does.
It not only powers our cities and towns.
And all the high-tech things we love.
It gives us the power to invent.
To explore.
To discover.
To create advanced technologies.
This invisible force creates jobs out of thin air.
It adds billions to our economy.
It's on even when we're not.
And stays on no matter what Mother Nature throws at it.
This invisible force takes us to the outer reaches of outer space.
And to the very depths of our oceans.
It brings us together. And it makes us better.
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Some people might say it's kind of unbelievable.
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