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Sarah Palin on Nuclear Energy

vlcsnap-1785193 It's in the mix. From her speech last night:

Starting in January, in a McCain-Palin administration, we're going to lay more pipelines ... build more nuclear plants ... create jobs with clean coal ... and move forward on solar, wind, geothermal and other alternative sources.

And second only to pipeline-laying - and that makes sense given Palin's background. We'll take it.

Picture of Palin. Let's see what McCain says tonight. (Slight Correction: we gave Ms. Palin back her "h" in the title.)

Comments

Anonymous said…
Sarah Palin fought the corruption of the big oil companies. Read her entire speech instead of quoting out of context.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080904/ap_on_el_pr/cvn_palin_text
David Bradish said…
Read her entire speech instead of quoting out of context.

I did and Mark didn't quote her out of context. Fighting big oil companies is different then laying pipelines. Not only that, Palin's statement on pipelines is in a completely different section then her statement on fighting lobbyists and big oil companies. I think you should take another read of her speech.
Anonymous said…
Oil and natural gas are different from coal. Oil and natural gas are where we get our primary source of fossil hydrogen. Hydrogen is vital to our economy. It converts solid carbon into liquid and gaseous forms. Hydrogen is fundamental in the transformation of carbon into plastics and petrochemicals.

We have at least 2 decades before nuclear and other non-fossil sources could credibly provide a significant fraction of the fossil hydrogen we currently consume and that we will continue to need. In the mean time, it is vastly better that we use fossil hydrogen from sources such as off-shore drilling, than to enable the continued expansion of fossil coal use.
GRLCowan said…
"Once-through U235 nuclear reactors can power our society for not more than 60 years.", says Ray Lightning, incorrectly. Driven by a uranium price that briefly exceeded $3 per barrel-of-oil-equivalent, prospectors have been finding 235-U at a rate, in oil-equivalent terms, of 100 million barrels per day.



--- G.R.L. Cowan, H2 energy fan 'til ~1996
http://www.eagle.ca/~gcowan
Anonymous said…
It is time we take a very good look at our country and the roll we play in today's world. America must wake up and stop playing ridiculous political games. Today we are not able to carry the world, this also applies to our bureaucracy and the hundreds of rich and ignorant pan-handlers our system feeds every day. Our country was founded by hard working people, who had one thing in common, the desire of freedom and the opportunity to be some- body. Let us unite and work together, stop the crying, let us find common ground and reach our dreams and goals, it's time we honor all those who gave their lives so we may live free. I have seen the world and it's not a beautiful sight, today people live with fear wishing they had freedom and the opportunity to be some-body. Wake up America, we need to be the beacon in a world of darkness.

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