Monday, July 29, 2013

Building Up Vogtle 3 and 4

Georgia Power created this time lapse footage of Vogtle 3 and 4 construction (perhaps in ancient Rome based on the title treatment).



Very nice. But just for fun - and because this video reminded me of it - here is a 1901 film informally called Building Up and Demolishing the Star Theater. The demolishing is in time lapse forward motion and the building up is the same in reverse motion. it was produced and directed by F.S. Armitage for the American Biograph Co., later home to D.W. Griffith, and became part of the National Film Registry in 2002. As far as anyone has determined, it is the first film made entirely of stop motion footage. That makes Georgia Power's film the scion of an exceptionally long legacy.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

I know it's not the politically correct thing for a pro-nuclear advocate to say, but it's just pain pathetic how slow nuclear construction in the US is. I also follow the Oil and Gas Industry, and the Sabine Pass LNG plant is as big a project as Vogtle just recently started. They have seemingly done as much construction there in the last three months as Vogtle has in three years. It takes the patience of a saint to watch nuclear construction because it's about as exciting as watching grass grow. It's not that the plants are any bigger or more complex, it's jsut the absurd level of regulation that kill the industry in this country. Vogtle basically sat on its ass for a year over concrete issues that in any other industry would have been resolved in a few days. Given the current state of the NRC I can't see where new nuclear construction can ever be cost competitive. The old plants which have been running for 40+ years have worked fine without these sort of absurd requirements during construction and so has all the other infrastructure in this country. The NRCs regulatory scheme "can't see the forest for the trees" as they cosntantly nitpick inane details while at the same time failing to regulate large safety lapses so long as those lapses lie outside of their somewhat arbitrarily picked designed basis accidents and risk analyses that only consider the "known unknowns" and never the "unknown unknowns".