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A Bright Electric Powered Future for the Car


After taking a hard look at the all-electric Tesla Roadster, Demon Speeding is conjuring up a hopeful, and fun, vision for the future of the automobile:
Voltage. Amps. Kilowatts. Zero Emissions. Lithium Ion. I see parking garages and parking lots of work places being equipped with plugs. I see gas stations offering “quick change” battery exchanges similar to the way one could exchange a propane tank today. I see the US taking a new interest in the development and construction of new nuclear power plants. I see electricity rates per kilowatt hour electricity rate falling to all-time lows. I see new racing leagues, in the spirit of Formula 1, Indy, Cart and NASCAR, being launched with all-electric vehicles. I see light at the end of the tunnel for a lifelong “gear-head”.
Sounds great to me. Zoom zoom!

Comments

Anonymous said…
If you've got a spare one hundred grand to throw around, I guess this is your car. But until the price drops to something less than a lifetime's earnings for ordinary folks, it will remain a playtoy for actors and corporate CEOs (as listed on the "ownership" section of the entry).
All cars were once playthings for the rich.

Electric cars would probably benefit more from nuclear power than you might think as a near-100% nuclear grid would allow non-metered electricity. And yes, we can get there--100% of electricity coming from nuclear energy (say 30% LWR, 18% HWR, 50% LMFBR, 2% experimental reactors like MSRs and PBMRs) is no less diverse than 100% coming from chemical energy (say 50% coal, 30% oil, 15% gas, 5% other gases).
Anonymous said…
+-Cars Rule!

The final transition to the electric everything will be done once the nuclear fusion reactor starts working. Hope we can see it in our life ;)

[+-]Everything!

Electric Emoticon Announcement
Ace said…
The price of this car and similar offerings should be dramatically reduced in the future. As in our blog Demon Speeding.., "But like any other new technology, the relative high cost is completely understandable. And if there is any one thing technological innovations have taught us over the past 2-3 decades, it’s that when technology is in high demand it has a tendency to do two things: improve rapidly and decrease in cost equally so. Anyone who bought a CD player in the mid 80’s, a DVD player in the mid 90’s, a computer in 2000 or a digital camera last month can attest to this."
Ace said…
We definitely need to start building new nuclear power stations. The ones that are operating today are 1950's technology, with the advancements in nuclear technology not only will the new power stations be able to generate electricity they will also be able to produce hydrogen giving us another alternative to fuel cars, homes and all sorts of electronic devices.
Anonymous said…
Yes, I understand that automobiles were once the exclusive playthings of the wealthy. That's why I said the price of this model will have to come down to something comparable to what we pay now for gasoline-powered vehicles if it is going to gain acceptance in the marketplace. It took a Henry Ford to do that in the early years of the auto industry. Is there someone out there who can do likewise with this technology?

The range issue must also be addressed, or the problem of charging time. I prefer to take my car on vacation. It is too expensive for my family to fly and then rent a car for a couple of weeks. We need our own vehicle. Depending on where we go, it might be anywhere from 600 to 1100 miles to our destination one way. Now I can "recharge" my gasoline burner at the pump in five minutes and be on my way for another 500 miles. Can something like that ever be hoped for from electric technology?
Do your homework...the folks at Tesla know the lies that are the Nuclear Renaissance, do not buy into your lies that nuclear is the great Green Earthmother of the hydrogen economy.
RemyC said…
Back OFF! Tesla Motors is selling their roadster with a residential PV system to charge the car! 330 green celebrities have already bought the car so far, ALL of them ANTI-nuclear... By this time next year, every other car on Rodeo drive will be an electric car.. Your industry is DEAD on arrival. Indian Point is down for the count... give it up already! Find yourselves honest work.

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