Monday, September 03, 2007

NRC Commissioner Edward McGaffigan Jr. Dies After Battle with Skin Cancer

Earlier today we heard the sad news that Edward McGaffigan, Jr., the longest-serving member of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, had died after a battle with skin cancer. He was 58. On news of his passing, NEI's President and CEO, Skip Bowman, issued the following statement:

“Ed McGaffigan was a giant among public servants, a commissioner who brought great passion and competency to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

“Commissioner McGaffigan was a voice of reason determined to assure public health and safety by advocating regulation that is rooted in sound science and engineering. He always voted his conscience, and he earned the respect of his colleagues and staff at the NRC, government leaders, the public and executives in the nuclear energy industry.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with Ed’s family and his co-workers at the NRC.”
For more information on McGaffigan's life, click here for an appreciation from NRC. Last December, Elizabeth Williamson wrote a story for the Washington Post that told the story about how he came to choose a life in government service.

4 comments:

rsm said...

Very sad. I will miss his straightforward approach and his struggle against nuclear scaremongering.

Anonymous said...

We can certainly honor his last couple of years in struggling against scaremongering, but it is more important to recognize his singular lack of success in effecting the Commission, the Staff and its contractors, and the nuclear industry, who are failing to fight scaremongering.

gunter said...

Lets also remember Commissioner McGaffigan for "Its time to stop digging at Yucca Mountain."

Anonymous said...

Yes. McGaffigan had it right. "Stop digging" is the only correct strategy to support nuclear power.

We don't need Yucca Mt until se need to store reprocessing waste (HLW).

(Unless we find nuclear power is not needed, in which case we can dispose of spent fuel in YM - but it would then be only after substantial decay/cooling from decades of interim storage.)