Skip to main content

It's a Green Kind of Planet, uh, Dude!

9146_1_230One of the complaints that those who like old movies have about newer specimens is that they suffer too much from visual ADD, unable to settle on an image long enough for it to register or on a dialogue long enough to create a character in depth. Everything gets hyped until nothing carries any meaning aside from nervous excitation.

So it is with considerable delight that the environmentally conscious, not to mention the culturally self-conscious, can look forward to a channel where actually focusing on an issue, any issue, might be considered taxing: Planet Green. The AP's David Bauder previews  tomorrow's debut:

"The network is not only not finger-wagging, it's sexy, it's interesting, it's irreverent," [network president Eileen] O'Neill,  said.

Planet Green doesn't want to be a network that appeals only to tree huggers and will always resist a heavy-handed approach, she said. Instead of scolding people not to waste paper by using juice boxes, the network will profile a person who built a business upon recycling them.

Thus you don't have to worry about whether or not to get your juice from a box, you just have to admire a guy who got rich turning them into paper towels. Okay.

The programming aims to mix lite celebrities with lite eco-friendly messages.

HBO "Entourage" star [Adrien] Grenier is host of "Alter Eco," where he and a team of experts show celebrities and ordinary people "the way to a hip green lifestyle."

Since leading a square green lifestyle would be, like, death, you know?

But there's more!

[Tommy] Lee and Ludacris will star, beginning in August, in "Battleground Earth," a series of competitions between the rocker and rapper to determine who's the greenest.

If there's one thing we know for sure, it's that the one who's the greenest will also be the hippest. (If we're lucky, John Travolta will drop by in full Cyclon drag and call them both rat-brains.)

While we're doubtful about the approach The Discovery Channel has chosen for this new outlet - available wherever Discovery Home was, as Plant Green takes its place - we've been wrong before and are reasonably sure we will be again.

Discovery, after all, has put up some good shows and if their initial approach to Planet Green doesn't quite work out, they can always tweak it to something perhaps a little less hip and just a touch more substantive. We might then tune in to see what's what even if Adrien Grenier were the host.

A little break from Lieberman-Warner. We'll be back on the beat tomorrow.

Adrien Grenier and Paris Hilton. Picture from Trendhunter. The text fills us in on the couple:  The pair attended the 11th Hour ForestEthics premier together, and have been spotted zooming around in a Toyoto Prius hybrid, “scoping out a new eco-friendly home for Paris.” That's almost too much eco-hipness for one sentence to contain.

A little more on Grenier's bona fides, also from Trendhunter: For him, it’s no publicity stunt; it’s a way of life. “I try to eat free range organic foods. I try and walk if I can, which is why I love New York. Take a train. My home is a green home. To me I look at it as an investment and the things may cost a little bit more but ultimately it pays for itself. And then it gives you low emissions and its good for the environment. So people invest in all sorts of bizarre things. Why not invest in the quality of life?” Why not indeed?

Comments

Kirk Sorensen said…
Somebody had to comment on this...

Why should anyone care about the lifestyles of young, vacuous, grungy/over-makeuped Hollywood media fodder who each have the carbon footprint of a small community?

I wonder the same thing when I'm going through the checkout line at the supermarket and wonder why they don't have Popular Mechanics, Aviation Week, or Scientific American there instead of the tabloid rags.

Buy your Prius and your CFLs and organic hummus and all carbon sins will be forgiven...

Popular posts from this blog

Making Clouds for a Living

Donell Banks works at Southern Nuclear’s Plant Vogtle units 3 and 4 as a shift supervisor in Operations, but is in the process of transitioning to his newly appointed role as the daily work controls manager. He has been in the nuclear energy industry for about 11 years.

I love what I do because I have the unique opportunity to help shape the direction and influence the culture for the future of nuclear power in the United States. Every single day presents a new challenge, but I wouldn't have it any other way. As a shift supervisor, I was primarily responsible for managing the development of procedures and programs to support operation of the first new nuclear units in the United States in more than 30 years. As the daily work controls manager, I will be responsible for oversight of the execution and scheduling of daily work to ensure organizational readiness to operate the new units.

I envision a nuclear energy industry that leverages the technology of today to improve efficiency…

Nuclear: Energy for All Political Seasons

The electoral college will soon confirm a surprise election result, Donald Trump. However, in the electricity world, there are fewer surprises – physics and economics will continue to apply, and Republicans and Democrats are going to find a lot to like about nuclear energy over the next four years.

In a Trump administration, the carbon conversation is going to be less prominent. But the nuclear value proposition is still there. We bring steady jobs to rural areas, including in the Rust Belt, which put Donald Trump in office. Nuclear plants keep the surrounding communities vibrant.

We hold down electricity costs for the whole economy. We provide energy diversity, reducing the risk of disruption. We are a critical part of America’s industrial infrastructure, and the importance of infrastructure is something that President-Elect Trump has stressed.

One of our infrastructure challenges is natural gas pipelines, which have gotten more congested as extremely low gas prices have pulled m…

Innovation Fuels the Nuclear Legacy: Southern Nuclear Employees Share Their Stories

Blake Bolt and Sharimar Colon are excited about nuclear energy. Each works at Southern Nuclear Co. and sees firsthand how their ingenuity powers the nation’s largest supply of clean energy. For Powered by Our People, they shared their stories of advocacy, innovation in the workplace and efforts to promote efficiency. Their passion for nuclear energy casts a bright future for the industry.

Blake Bolt has worked in the nuclear industry for six years and is currently the work week manager at Hatch Nuclear Plant in Georgia. He takes pride in an industry he might one day pass on to his children.

What is your job and why do you enjoy doing it?
As a Work Week Manager at Plant Hatch, my primary responsibility is to ensure nuclear safety and manage the risk associated with work by planning, scheduling, preparing and executing work to maximize the availability and reliability of station equipment and systems. I love my job because it enables me to work directly with every department on the plant…