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Pulling Together to Help Japan

Here are some efforts by nuclear energy companies to help out at Fukushima Daiichi. There have, of course, been others:

Constellation:

Constellation Energy today [March 14] announced that it has donated $50,000 through the Constellation Energy Foundation to the American Red Cross in support of relief efforts for the victims of the recent earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Additionally, Constellation Energy will match all employee donations to any qualified relief organizations through the company's Matching Gifts program.

This donation continues the strong partnership between Constellation Energy and the American Red Cross. In 2010, the American Red Cross honored Constellation Energy with the Corporate Gift of Life Award for their continuous support through company sponsored blood drives and monetary donations.

The American Red Cross has made its resources available to assist their global partners in the Pacific nations as needed. The Japanese Red Cross Society currently has 11 teams mobilized to heavily damaged communities, providing assessments, first aid and much needed supplies.

Individuals can help those affected by the earthquake by making a contribution to the American Red Cross at www.redcross.org.

GE:

Immediately following the magnitude 9.0 offshore quake and tsunami, GE Chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt announced that the company will commit $5 million in cash, equipment and services toward relief efforts in Japan. Some of these donations have already been identified and put into place.

  • The GE Foundation, which is the philanthropic arm of GE, has committed ¥100 million (USD$1.25 million) to Japan Red Cross.
  • The GE Foundation has committed ¥100 million (USD$1.25 million) to Miyagi Prefecture Disaster Response Fund. Miyagi Prefecture is the hardest hit area as its capital is the city of Sendai.
  • A total of USD $0.7 million in healthcare-related product donations have been committed, including handheld ultrasounds. The units are in stock and we are working with the Japanese government’s Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) to deploy the units to medical teams and practitioners assisting victims of the disaster.

Toshiba:

Toshiba has sent more than 100 engineers to help resolve the crisis at nuclear plants in northeastern Japan, the company said in a statement Tuesday.

The company said more than 100 engineers were "providing vital support and resources" at the Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi and Fukushima Daini plants after requests from the power company and the Japanese government.

"Toshiba will reinforce these resources as required," the company said, noting that 700 engineers at other facilities were also analyzing the the Fukushima Daiichi plant's situation. Toshiba supplied four of the reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, according to the World Nuclear Association.

AREVA:

Following the earthquake and tsunami that struck northern Japan, AREVA is mobilizing its forces to provide support to residents of the affected area and to the rescue workers and personnel working near the Fukushima nuclear plant. 

AREVA has chartered a plane that will depart for Japan as soon as possible to deliver 3,000 activated charcoal protective masks, 10,000 overalls and 20,000 gloves. The aircraft will also carry 100 tons of boric acid, a neutron absorber, made available by EDF.

French rescue workers left for Japan early this week with radioactivity detection equipment provided by AREVA’s subsidiary, Canberra, specializing in the manufacture of nuclear detection and measurement equipment. Equipment in AREVA’s Tokyo offices has already been made available to the Japanese security teams.

The Group also decided as of Monday to donate one million euros to the Japanese Red Cross.

A mere tip of the iceberg.

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