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Mothers in Nuclear – Yes, They Do Exist

mothers-logo-horizontal1The Clean Energy Insight blog, which is the blog for the North American Young Generation in Nuclear, just published four stories from mothers who work in the nuclear industry. Being a mother and having any job is tough enough; working in the nuclear industry on top of it is, well, it makes for some good stories. Here’s one nugget from a mother who described the unique circumstances she found herself in when it came to breastfeeding:

Issue #1: Getting a breastpump through security. Need I say more? The situation was usually comical, but one special day stands out in my mind. After what seemed like the hundredth time passing my breastpump through security, a well-meaning guard asked me to open the “mechanism.” The breastpump itself is sealed for sanitation and functional purposes, so opening the “mechanism” was a tall order. After a few minutes of trying to explain this to him, he was saved by a coworker who took over the search and muttered an apology to me without ever raising his eyes. Embarrassing, yes. Unexpected, not really.

And some advice from another working mom:

Being a working mom is a balancing act. You have to start by setting your priorities—family first, in my opinion—and sticking to them. Our extended family didn’t respond enthusiastically when we first talked about our plan of becoming a one-income household with my husband holding down the home front. But they now see how much it has benefitted the kids and the family as a whole. All moms will eventually find the equation that works best for them. Being a good mom does not mean that you have to sacrifice your career and upward mobility, but it may mean that you need to modify your approach from time to time. I wish you all the energy you will need as you find the right balance for your family!

Yes, moms do exist in the nuclear industry and yes, the kids don’t come out radioactive. Be sure to stop by and read the rest of the stories!

Comments

Vitale Family said…
Refreashing to see family related stories. Thank you to all of the Moms that shared. It is wonderful to share through these stories how a younger generation of 'nukes' are handling motherhood, parenthood and life!
Morgan Davis said…
This is a great series. I am not a mom currently but I will be hopefully starting my family in the next few years. I think that these types of stories and forms are critical for young mothers, soon to be mothers, and just young women aspiring to have a family someday because there are not many women mentors in the industry (yet anyways... numbers are on the rise). It is a great forum to share ideas and offer support to eachother. Thank you to everybody that contributed and I encourage others to share their stories as well.
gunter said…
David,
I suspect the next NAYGN project will be posting sonagrams of "Next Generation In Utero for Nuclear Energy," or maybe "Fetal Advocates Working on Nuclear"(FAWN). All they need fear, is fear itself, of course.

More signs of desperate times.

Hmmmm? 19 of 104 US reactors listed at zero power today on NRC's Power Reactor Status Report for October 24, 2011.
Brian Mays said…
"Hmmmm? 19 of 104 US reactors listed at zero power today on NRC's Power Reactor Status Report for October 24, 2011."

Yeah ... Those in the business call it "Outage Season." It happens every spring and fall when the demand for electricity is relatively low.
Anonymous said…
I want a shirt with your logo! I was a chem tech though both of my pregnancies - the hardest part is the well meaning folks who recommended that I take a desk job. Hormesis anyone?

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