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Earth Day Canada Kicks Up The FUD on Nuclear Energy

Earth Day Canada has just started a new blog called Eco Kids. Earlier today, they decided that their topic of the day would be nuclear power:
There are several pros and cons of nuclear power. One pro is: it does not directly produce pollution. Cons of nuclear power are: it produces nuclear waste that is dangerous to humans and ecosystems; nuclear waste takes millions of years to decompose; and, it takes a lot of energy to mine the uranium used to create nuclear power. Thousands of gallons of petroleum are used in the mining process, releasing a lot of greenhouse gases.
My, what a balanced presentation! I count at least three half-truths and one outright error. How about you?

I left a comment directing their readers to NEI's Science Club, our own Web property geared toward school age children, but my comment has yet to be moderated. I wonder if it ever will.

As always, if you stop by to leave a comment, please be polite.

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Comments

Anonymous said…
Your admirably low-key comment is now visible. Nice contrast to the sudden outbreak of hysteria in middle of their main article.
The comment I left wasn't nearly as low-key but it was not impolite. I pointed out some of the misleading statements and questioned whether this was the best approach to encourage critical thinking in children. It's been nearly 24 hours and my comment has not appeared. Has anyone else tried?
Anonymous said…
LEAVE it to NEI to attempt lying to little children....Sure my comments will be removed from that sight, but perhaps the teacher will have enough sense to look into the true ills associated with nuclear power. Perhaps the teacher will realize NEI is the propaganda and lobbying arm of the nuclear industry.
Wow. Did you even look at the NEI science club site for kids? There isn't anything on there that isn't scientific or demonstrated fact. It isn't trying to tell kids that nuclear is the answer to every problem. Issues that are certainly debatable among reasonable adults, issues that we debate here on the blog and elsewhere, aren't found on the site for children. Sure NEI has a few lobbyists but its mission is much broader and as a nuclear engineer I'm proud to be a part of the organization because I believe nuclear is an important part of our energy mix. And obviously we don't try to squelch discussion on the issues or your comment and many others would be removed. So I fail to see how this falls into the realm of "lies and propaganda."

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