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Fighting for Nuclear Energy in Vermont

Patrick Moore is back in Vermont, fighting local anti-nukes over the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant. From the Barrie-Montpelier Times Argus:
"Nuclear energy has key environmental benefits," Moore said. With as many as 30 new nuclear plants in the planning stages the United States is joining the rest of the world in a "nuclear renaissance," Moore said.

Some of the lawmakers were not impressed.

Rep. Sarah Edwards, P-Brattleboro, said that Moore only told part of the story, particularly when he said nuclear power was one of the cheapest sources of electricity.

"The federal government has been subsidizing this industry from the very beginning," she said. "My guess is if you look at the history of subsidies on that you will find a huge difference."

[...]

Rep. Tony Klein, D-East Montpelier, said that if renewable energy sources like solar and wind power got the same subsidies they would be as cost-effective as nuclear electricity.

"If only it could be as simple and as safe and as cheap as he is pretending it is the world would be a wonderful place," Klein said. "The facts tell a different story."
Actually, as both David Bradish and N. Nadir have determined, the story is quite a lot different than anti-nukes would have you believe. But then again, the real strategy isn't to tell the truth, it's simply to tell the same lies over and over again that you can't determined what the truth is anymore.

For more, visit WCAX-TV. For a previous post on another Moore trip to Vermont, click here.

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Comments

Anonymous said…
I'm getting really, really weary of this "subsidies" crap. Everyone I know who runs a nuclear plant pays their way for everything. They pay for the land. They pay for the plant hardware. They pay for personnel. They pay taxes. They pay for the fuel. They pay for the Yucca Mountain waste disposal facility. They pay for insurance. They pay for the "privilege" of being regulated by the feds. About the only thing they don't pay for is the air they breathe. But I guess that's next on the list for the anti-nuke wackos.
Robert said…
You guys have to put up a FAQ to allow us to rebut these lame assertions.
Anonymous said…
Very ironic that they would be fighting against Vermont Yankee. Here is a power plant that has generated huge amounts of GHG-free electricity over decades at economical cost, has never had a major accident, no injuries or deaths among the public or employees, in every way an example of the kind of clean, reliable, cost-effective power production that an ecologically-conscious state would want to have. Yet here these poeple are bad-mouthing the place and wanting to get rid of it. To replace it with what? They can't build more hydroelectric (with the one group out west agitating to blow up those dams on the Klamath River to let the trout through). The climate in New England isn't quite ideal for solar (besides the problem of what do you do at night). Wind is unreliable and can't carry the load and people will oppose it because it clutters up the views of those nice mountains and valleys. They don't want coal because it's dirty. Natural gas is expensive and not all that abundant in the Northeast. You could cut all the wood down in the Green Mountain forests and still not have enough energy. So then what?
>>So then what?

Blame 'the big corporations' for not providing enough electricity, pick a target, and sue it into bankruptcy. Repeat until the Canadians build a power line from one of their (potential) new nukes, and then say that the entire state runs on wind.

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