Tuesday, June 05, 2007

Talking The Talk on Nuclear Energy

It's one thing to be a blogger, but speaking to your local Rotary Club is another great way to get the message out about our industry and how it can protect the environment while supporting energy security.

3 comments:

gunter said...

Not surprising that the GE engineer is peddling such misinformation as "nuclear plants give off no toxic emissions as their only airborne discharge is steam (water)."

This is simply not true.
Carbon emissions aside, which he did not qualify in his statement, from the fuel fabrication process, routine operations release a wide variety of radioisotopes to both the air and water and eventually the soil. Simply look at the annual radioactive discharge reports for each and every nuclear power station and you will see a wide variety of routine release rates.

Oyster Creek for example released more than 1 million curies out the elevated stack in 1979 alone and nobody at NRC as much as batted an eye.

Such claims are also in denial of the radioactive waste stream that comes from reactors and remains unresolved.

So alot more than water vapor is coming off every reactor. Clearly the hope here is that if you tell a lie enough times, people will start to believe it.

Anonymous said...

gunter wrote: "Clearly the hope here is that if you tell a lie enough times, people will start to believe it."

Well, Mr. Gunter, working for NIRS, you should be well equipped to educate us about that. Only, you call them "factoids."

Anonymous said...

Weak gunter, weak. Try a little harder with the misinformation. I mean it's only misinformation if it's somewhat plausible, yet not really true. Your post here doesn't even qualify as misinformation because it is so obviously false.

Anyone in the nuclear power industry can tell you that routine discharges from commercial nuclear power are trivial by way of comparison with the fluctuation in natural background radiation. Note I said the "fluctuation" and not the actual level. Even releases from incidents such as TMI-2 were inconsequential.