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An Interview With Patrick Moore

Michael Kanellos of CNet recently interviewed CASEnergy co-chair Patrick Moore. Here's an excerpt:
Q: When people look at your biography and see you're a Greenpeace co-founder and now a nuclear advocate, they don't believe it. Could you give us a synopsis of your personal history on this issue?
Moore: Well, actually I did feel a little lonely in that corner for a while, but I've been joined by the likes of Stewart Brand, Jared Diamond (author of Guns, Germs, and Steel), and (environmental author) Tim Flannery, and now we form a fairly serious phalanx of pro-nuclear environmentalists. In fact, I'm the honorary chair of the Canadian chapter of Environmentalists for Nuclear Energy, which has 9,000 members worldwide.

As a co-founder of Greenpeace, even though I was a scientist, I made the same mistake in those days as all the rest of my colleagues did. We kind of lumped nuclear energy in with nuclear weapons as if all things nuclear were evil. It was an honest mistake. We were totally focused on the threat of nuclear war during the Cold War. Nuclear testing was what Greenpeace started on and we were peaceniks, and I think it's fair to say that the antinuclear-energy movement to some extent was formed out of the peace movement.

But in retrospect, I believe we failed to make an important distinction between the peaceful versus the destructive uses of a technology. There are many technologies that are very good that can be used for destructive purposes. Cars can be made into car bombs as long as you have a little bit of fertilizer and diesel oil. Machetes have killed more people than any other weapon in the last 20 years, over a million, and yet they're the most important tool for farmers in the developing world.
For our Patrick Moore archive, click here.

Comments

Gunter said…
"The subtle traitor needs no sophist."
Shakespeare

No surprise here... is it any wonder that Patrick More Nukes gets his paychecks and his sound bites from NEI?
Anonymous said…
Ad hominem is the best you can do, Gunter? Figures.

"Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength."

--Eric Hoffer
Anonymous said…
Actually, Gunter's message applies - to him. Being environmentalist means that one cares about the environment and exercises careful stewardship for God's gift. It means we don't use the atmosphere and water as sewers. It means we don't tear up the land. It means that we use nuclear energy because such small mass gives such great energy with so little environmental impact.

Only a traitor to the environmental movement would therefore oppose nuclear power.
Starvid said…
I wonder who sends Gunther his paychecks?

I bet on Peabody.

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