Monday, October 17, 2005

ABC News Quote of the Day

This comes from a story from Friday's USA Today on the ABC News report on testing and research reactors:

Ohio State and Kansas State officials say they give tours because, as educational facilities, it's their job to spread the word about how nuclear energy is being used.

Saying the interns were able to get close to the facility is "like coming to my driveway and saying, 'Guess what? I just got into McDonald's!'" said Earle Holland, Ohio State senior director for research communications.
Folks, Earle Holland is one of the heroes of this story, in that he won't let ABC News get away with what they've done.

News flash: We won't either. Hat tip to the National Review Media Blog for the link.

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2 comments:

Anonymous said...

From the link:

"Two of the students have subsequently gotten jobs at ABC News and Ross said he hoped the network would hire more."

Well of course ABC hired them. They have demonstrated that they have what it takes to be in the mainstream news media nowadays: they can lie, take quotes out of context, selectively embellish a story, abuse sources, make a non-story into a piece of overhyped trash, allow themselves to be duped, practice "gotcha!" journalism, and all the other tricks of the trade. In short, they know what it takes to work in network news these days. Naturally they're going to be offered jobs.

Journalism seems to be the one profession where being a dishonest person seems to be a prerequisite for a job. In other professions, perhaps those more ethical than journalism, being honest is considered a virtue. In the sensationalist news business, being honest is a ticket to nowhere.

Brian Mays said...

Anonymous said... "Journalism seems to be the one profession where being a dishonest person seems to be a prerequisite for a job. In other professions, perhaps those more ethical than journalism, being honest is considered a virtue. In the sensationalist news business, being honest is a ticket to nowhere."

You're forgetting about politics, and journalists often cover politicians. I guess the dishonesty must rub off.