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Constellation Announces COL Application

From the wire:
Constellation Energy (NYSE: CEG) today announced that it intends to apply to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a combined construction and operating license (COL). This is the first step in a multi-phase process that could ultimately lead to the development and deployment of its first nuclear power plant in more than 30 years. Sites under consideration include the company's Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant in Southern Maryland and the Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station in upstate New York. Final site selection is expected by early next year.

"With this announcement, Constellation Energy confirms its position as one of the leaders in bringing new nuclear power in this country one step closer to reality," said Michael J. Wallace, executive vice president for Constellation Energy. "Our decision to file with the NRC at this time is consistent with our disciplined value-driven approach to nuclear power, and our recently announced partnership with AREVA, Inc. and the formation of UniStar Nuclear. But for passage and enactment of the Energy Policy Act, we would not be making this announcement today. We appreciate the support and leadership demonstrated by the Administration and Congress on this issue."
More great news. Announcements like this one are exactly why I joined up with the nuclear energy industry.

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Solomon2 said…
Yes, but what are they going to do about their existing nuclear power plants? The 30-year licenses are almost up and the interim fuel storage areas are nearly full...
David Bradish said…
What they are going to do is let them keep running. Calvert Cliffs was the first nuclear plant in the U.S. to receive a 20 year license extension which doesn't expire till 2034 and 2036. Nine Mile Point submitted a license renewal application back in May 2004 for their first unit which will be granted and exteded to 2029. Nine Mile Point 2's 40 year license doesn't even expire till 2026 and I'm sure will keep running till 2046.

Constellation announced their intentions for their COL application however the plant probably won't be up and running for another ten years. Hopefully by then we'll have definite plans with what to do with all the spent fuel.
Matthew66 said…
Further, lets hope that by the time the first new reactors spent fuel pools are filling up, the Department of Energy will have issued the specifications for the generic spent fuel casks to be stored in Yucca Mountain (see "DOE Directs Contractor on Repository" on this site on October 25). This would enable utilities to remove the spent fuel from their pools and store it on-site in the cask until it's ready to go to Nevada. I would not be surprised if the utilities design a below ground storage facility for these casks, just to make the licensing process that much easier.
Anonymous said…
Hopefully UCI / Tri Alpha Energy will have proven their nuclear waste treating (eating?) technology long before then so all we'll need to worry about is keeping it all where it's supposed to be.

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