Monday, February 19, 2007

Lovelock: Greenpeace Making "Incredible Mistake" on Nuclear Energy

At the end of last week, we linked to a number of bloggers who took issue with the decision of the High Court in London to scuttle the U.K. government's energy review that called for an increase in new nuclear build.

Yesterday, James Lovelock, the father of the Gaia Theory, joined the chorus condemning Greenpeace, who filed the lawsuit, and continues to work to block the progress of the industry globally:

What an incredible mistake Greenpeace made when it took the government to court in an attempt to delay the building of new nuclear power stations. By so doing it increases the burden of carbon dioxide (C02) the Earth has to bear; nuclear is the only large-scale energy source that is emissions free.

Why don’t we wake up and emulate the French, who make almost all their electricity from nuclear energy? French trains are legendary, especially the TGV. One of these bound for Marseilles was standing at the Gare de Lyon; it seemed like any other train except that it was double decked. We climbed aboard and took our seats on the upper tier and sat back as it travelled from Paris to Marseilles at 200mph.

No wonder the French are building an even faster train track from Paris to Germany. Best of all, this form of intercity travel is the world’s only wholly carbon-free nonpolluting way of travelling, because the trains are powered by nuclear electricity. Soon our cars and trucks will be powered by batteries charged from the electricity supply. What a wonderful way to avoid C02 emissions, but only if we make nuclear our source of electricity.
For more on James Lovelock from our archives, click here.

1 comment:

Brian Mays said...

Yes, the TGV is really cool. Not all of the passenger cars are double-deckers, but the French railway company had to develop these double-decker cars for the popular routes to keep up with demand.

It's difficult to appreciate how fast they go (especially from inside -- the ride is so smooth) until you are in a TGV station and watch one of the trains blow by at top speed.

And remember, these are nuclear-powered trains. The electricity that runs them is almost exclusively provided by nuclear plants.