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Lovelock: Renewable Energy is "Well-meaning nonsense."

James Lovelock's book, The Revenge of Gaia is being translated into German, which is why Der Speigel got around to interviewing the venerable climate scientist.

I'm guessing most environmental radicals won't like what he has to say:
Lovelock has nothing but ridicule for environmentalists' favorite issues, such as "sustainable development" and "renewable energy," calling them "well-meaning nonsense." He is convinced that wind and solar energy will never be even remotely capable of meeting worldwide energy needs. In China alone, for example, a new large coal power plant is put into operation every five days, imposing additional burdens on the atmosphere. The only solution, according to Lovelock, is the massive expansion of nuclear energy worldwide.

A reliable supply of electricity, says Lovelock, is the key issue when it comes to survival on a warmer planet. He loses no sleep over the risks of nuclear power.

"Show me the mass graves of Chernobyl," he demands provocatively. No more than a few thousand people died after the 1986 meltdown -- a small price to pay, he says, compared to the millions who could fall victim to CO2.
For the actual toll at Chernobyl according to a recent UN report, click here.
He adds that compact nuclear waste is vastly easier to control than the close to 30 billion tons of CO2 released into the atmosphere each year by the burning of fossil fuels.

"Fanatical Greens" who confuse nuclear power with nuclear bombs, says Lovelock, have discredited this source of energy. Do-gooders, he adds, are concerned about pesticide residues in bananas and the link between mobile phones and cancer, all the while accepting CO2 poisoning as a necessary evil. "They strain out the mosquitoes while blithely swallowing camels," he says.
Sounds like Lovelock has been reading the BioNuclear Bunny.

UPDATE: More from the Brothers Judd.

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For a more accurate link on the actual effects of Chernobyl, see
Zbigniew Jaworowski's "The Real Chernobyl Folly,"

http://www.21stcenturysciencetech.com/2006_articles/spring%202006/Chernobyl_Folly.pdf

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