Skip to main content

Steven Chu on the Sunday Morning Shows

Energy Secretary Steven Chu made the rounds of the morning shows today – virtually all of them – to talk about the Fukushima Daiichi and its implications for the American nuclear energy industry. Let’s see what the lead is in the first coverage of his appearances:

From Bloomburg:

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu said the worst is probably over in Japan as efforts to stabilize the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant have had some success.

From The Wall Street Journal:

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu said Sunday that the Japanese are making progress at stabilizing the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and said U.S. regulators are reviewing the safety of reactors with a similar design.

This one, from Reuters, tries a different tack:

Japan's nuclear crisis will influence where the United States builds future nuclear power plants, and the operation of a facility near New York City will be reviewed in the wake of the disaster, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu said on Sunday.

All plants are being reviewed, so that one’s easy. I haven’t seen the transcript for Fox News Sunday (we have Chu’s appearance on CNN’s State of the Union in an earlier post), which this report uses, but it quotes Chu:

"Certainly where we site reactors -- and where we site reactors going forward -- will be different than where we might have sited them in the past," Chu said on "Fox News Sunday."

The Department of Energy doesn’t usually weigh in on siting; it’d be interesting to see the context of the quote.

Oh, here’s the context, from Fox News itself:

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is reviewing reactor safety in the United States in light of the partial meltdown in Japan, and will determine whether nuclear reactors in the future should be constructed in less populous locations, Energy Secretary Stephen Chu said Sunday.

That makes more sense.

Comments

Horizon3 said…
Chu is a funny guy.

Glad he made time to go yap the Sunday morning shows.

Aside from that he has no dog in the hunt, and he's just beating his gums.

He and DOE/EPA have NO jurisdiction over civilian nuclear power plants, they fall exclusively under the NRC which is a separate entity from DOE, and is headed by Chairman Gregory Jaczko.
DocForesight said…
I watched FOX News Sunday and was not impressed with Sec. Chu's answers. No doubt he is a smart man, but being able to vigorously defend the safety and siting of our nuclear power plants would do much to quell the hysteria surrounding this tragic natural calamity in Japan.

Japan is on the "Ring of Fire" fault-tectonic plate and even a 9.0 didn't cause Fukushima to fail. Indian Point carries no such uncertainty - heck, not even Diablo Canyon or San Onofre for gosh sakes!

If you are going to make the appearance on TV, then be fair but resolute in our safety systems, review protocol and designs.

Popular posts from this blog

Why Ex-Im Bank Board Nominations Will Turn the Page on a Dysfunctional Chapter in Washington

In our present era of political discord, could Washington agree to support an agency that creates thousands of American jobs by enabling U.S. companies of all sizes to compete in foreign markets? What if that agency generated nearly billions of dollars more in revenue than the cost of its operations and returned that money – $7 billion over the past two decades – to U.S. taxpayers? In fact, that agency, the Export-Import Bank of the United States (Ex-Im Bank), was reauthorized by a large majority of Congress in 2015. To be sure, the matter was not without controversy. A bipartisan House coalition resorted to a rarely-used parliamentary maneuver in order to force a vote. But when Congress voted, Ex-Im Bank won a supermajority in the House and a large majority in the Senate. For almost two years, however, Ex-Im Bank has been unable to function fully because a single Senate committee chairman prevented the confirmation of nominees to its Board of Directors. Without a quorum

New Home for Our Blog: Join Us on NEI.org

On February 27, NEI launched the new NEI.org . We overhauled the public site, framing all of our content around the National Nuclear Energy Strategy. So, what's changed? Our top priority was to put you, the user, first. Now you can quickly get the information you need.  You'll enjoy visiting the site with its intuitive navigation, social media integration and compelling and shareable visuals.  We've added a feature called Nuclear Now, which showcases the latest industry news and resources like fact sheets and reports. It's one of the first sections you'll see on our home page and it can be accessed anywhere throughout the site by clicking on the atom symbol in the top right corner of the page. Most importantly for you, our loyal NEI Nuclear Notes readers, is that we've migrated the blog to the new site. Moving forward,  all blog posts will be published in the News section , along with our press releases, Nuclear Energy Overview stories and more. Just l

Hurricane Harvey Couldn't Stop the South Texas Project

The South Texas Project As Hurricane Harvey battered southeast Texas over the past week, the devastation and loss of life in its wake have kept our attention and been a cause of grief. Through the tragedy, many stories of heroics and sacrifice have emerged. Among those who have sacrificed are nearly 250 workers who have been hunkered down at the South Texas Project (STP) nuclear plant in Matagorda County, Texas. STP’s priorities were always the safety of their employees and the communities they serve. We are proud that STP continued to operate at full power throughout the storm. It is a true testament to the reliability and resiliency of not only the operators but of our industry. The world is starting to notice what a feat it is to have maintained operations through the catastrophic event. Forbes’ Rod Adams did an excellent job describing the contribution of these men and women : “STP storm crew members deserve to be proud of the work that they are doing. Their famil